THIS IS A WORK IN PROGRESS AND IS NOT A DEFINITIVE LISTING - ANY HELP WITH CREW PHOTOS EXTRA INFO APPRECIATED

  

  Aircraft by type

Vought F-8 Crusader
Losses & Ejections
Part 1: 1956 - 1964
[Part 2 : 1965 - 1966]
Preliminary Listing
(Help appreciated to add pilot names and photos)
[any errors or omissions noticed please let me know so that I can correct them - mbenshar@aol.com ]

   Operators


USN

USMC
       
Date Air Force A'cft Unit / Serial based crashed crew photo seat
      1956

1st February 1956


Vought
USMC

Vought F8U-1
Crusader

140444

Edwards Air Force Base

Crashed  north Of Edwards AFB

Vought test pilot Harry T. Brackett
killed

Vought

4th May 1956
Vought
USMC
Crusader F8U-1 141337 crashed  near Greenville, Texas during an evaluation flight in US Captain James Feliton
USMC ejected safely.
This was the first ejection from a Crusader.
[see 14th August 1956]
Vought
14th August 1956
Vought
 F8U‑1
Crusader
    engine failed at high altitude Test pilot John W. Konrad, the first man to fly an F-8 in March 1955, was forced to eject (in a pressure suit) Vought

?? December 1956


USN

Vought F8U-1  Crusader

XC

VX-3
NAS Atlantic City, NJ USA

Landed short of runway

Pilot
???

 

 

Is this the loss shown below ?

Thursday 21st December 1956


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

XC

VX-3
NAS Atlantic City, NJ USA

Took off from New Jersey. Crashed five minutes later.  Lost wing at around 500 knots

LT Robert Dale Roth
killed

Vought

      1957
30th January 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
141350 VX-3 in US CAPT Robert "Bob" Dose ejected

[personal testimony]

Vought

2nd April 1957


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

XC

VX-3
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt

Landing gear broken on landing

pilot
???

 

 

Friday 5th April 1957


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

141358
XC

VX-3
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt

Lost power on take off. Crashed into sea. Pilot and helicopter winchman drowned

CDR Raymond A. Boyd
no ejection

Vought

FEEDBACK

This pilot was my grandfather,  CDR Raymond A. Boyd  USN Academy ’42.
I don’t have any info on the seaman who also lost his life
Regards

Stefan Reuther
in email 24th February 2011

6th June 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
141361  VF-32 in US LTJG M, G, McCanna Jr, ejected Vought
Friday 7th June 1957 Vought  F8U‑1
 Crusader
  Vought Crashed following explosion near Trinity Rivers following low high speed pass over Hensley NAS  demonstrating the aircraft to graduating cadets. At he end of the runway the aircraft disintegrated due to the structural limits of the airframe being exceeded Vought Test Pilot
James Buckner
31
killed
  Vought
Monday 24th June 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
141690 VF-32
NAS Cecil Field
 Flame out shortly after take off. Crashed near Cecil Field in US LTJG Jerome T. J. Dennehy ejected Vought
24th July 1957
USMC
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
141357 VX-3 in US MAJOR A. F. McCaleb Jr., ejected

First USMC ejection
(from this type of aircraft ??)
  Vought
30th July 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
142414 VF-32  Returning from a NAS Pensacola static display in US LTJG H. D. Veland ejected
killed
  Vought
15th August 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143702 VF-154  in US LTJG R. J. St. Leger ejected   Vought
5th September 1957
USN
F8U-3
F-8A Crusader
143733 VX-3 in US LT R. H. Tabor
(M. C.)
ejected
  Vought
12th September 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
141356 VF-32 in US LTJG H. J. Smith ejected Vought

20th September 1957


USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143700 VF-32 Mid-air while on deployment in US LTJG C. B. Lapp ejected
[see also 17th October 1957]
Vought

23rd September 1957


USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143704
VF-211
"Checkertails"
Monterrey Bay
in US
LTJG R. Clifton "Cliff" Jones Jr., ejected
Recovered by helo
Vought
17th October 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
142413 VF-32  Mid-air while on deployment in US LTJG C. B. Lapp ejected
[see also 20th September 1957]
Vought
1st November 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143736 VF-103 in US ENSIGN W. R. Cruthirds Jr., ejected
low level killed
  Vought
 6th November 1957
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143721 VF-32 in US LTJG C. T. Lusk ejected Vought
19th November 1957
USN

Vought F8 U-1 Crusader

143727
NL-4???

VF-154

Crashed into Pacific after landing problems. Disappeared flying back to land base

Ltjg Cliff Thompson
killed

 

 

      1958
6th January 1958
USN
YF8U-1
Crusader
141343 NATC PAX. Patuxent in U.S MAJOR Tim J. Keane Jr.
ejected
killled
  Vought
FEEDBACK

Dear Sir
Your web site on Crusader ejections gives pause.
My Dad, Cdr Harvey Hop was in Test Pilot class 17 with both Jim Buckner (Chance Vought test pilot) and Maj. Tim Keane. Dad got checked out in the F8U-1P and got a 1,000 mph club pin.
I didn't realize the danger.

Major Keane's Crusader blew up pretty much over my high school, Great Mills High which was about 10 miles from Pax River. Someone set off the fire alarm at the school and we streamed outside.
There, I looked up to see his chute descending, but he was unconscious, mortally injured by the exploding plane. Students on the athletic field were doused with fuel and there was a lot of scrap aluminum fluttering down.
The Major's unconcious form landed on the roof of the school, but was dragged off and ended up on the ground in spite of the efforts of our magnificent gym teacher, Mr. Bean. Bean scaled the wall but was too late to prevent the final fall.
There was a lot of hysterical screaming, but soon students were brought under control and returned to class. We later learned Maj Keane was killed.

My Dad said he pulled the wing off, and he also said that Buckner suffered the same fate .

Later as a Marine at NAS Millington, I watched a Crusader break to enter downwind repositioning the wing at the same time. I remember it being the tightest turn I'd ever seen a fighter do.

A couple years later at MCAS El Toro, a VMGR 352 Hercules with a faulty shut off valve over-fueled both of those two F8E's from VMF 323 (The squadron was deploying to Japan) that caught fire and went down on consecutive days. I met the Lt. whose chute streamed and he survived. He had a different outlook on life.

I hope you find this information useful?

Harvey Hop Jr, Retired teacher who loves planes especially the Crusader
I was an electronics tech & Cpl in the Marines.
in emails December 2011

7th January 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
142415 Moffett in U.S LTJG Wayne Bartley
ejected
  Vought

21st January 1958
is date 23rd ??


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

143773
NL-402

VF-154

Ramp strike. Crashed into the Pacific about 400 miles west of Los Angeles

Ltjg Lou Jesse
killed

 

 

5th March 1958
USN
F8U‑1 Crusader  143801
NL 411
VF-154 from carrier USS Hancock (CVA-19) hydraulic failure during attempted landing on carrier. Crashed shortly after boltering. In Pacific off Ohau, HI, USA  LTJG Chuck F. Ramsey ejected too low for full parachute deployment.
Pilot
killed

photo via John "Crash" Miottel
Vought
 

"As to ejection from a CRUSADER, the F 8 had quite a lurid record. Except for one single month there was at least one F 8 ejection each and every month during the 13-year period from June 1957 to May 1970. The real problem was that for those of us flying the F 8 prior to the mid 1960s, the ejection scenario had a very discouraging glitch. If you had less than 1,500 to 2,000 feet of altitude when the time came to part company with your aircraft, the chances of surviving such a  "low level" ejection ran the entire gamut from nil to zero.

My roommate, Chuck Ramsey had confirmed that ugly reality as I prepared for my CRUSADER'S debut with the barricade. I watched in horror as his F 8 touched down on deck and WHAM! His port main landing gear disintegrated. Unfortunately, this was an all too common occurrence at this stage of the CRUSADER'S career. It was even more distressing because the landing gear struts also served as the reservoir for the hydraulic fluid necessary to operate the CRUSADER'S flight controls. Chuck poured the coal to the crippled CRUSADER.

He was trying to nurse it up to speed and to get to an altitude high enough to eject. The F 8 staggered up to about 700 feet when one of the control officers on the ship apparently mistook the streaming hydraulic fluid for smoke--to him this meant only one thing, FIRE! He frantically squawked over the radio "BAIL OUT-BAIL OUT NOW!!" Before I could even key my mike to warn Chuck otherwise, he ejected. He was just able to unstrap and disengage himself from the ejection seat. He tumbled in free fall and his parachute streamed. But the chute did not have time to blossom. He dropped like a sack of rocks and hit the water at terminal velocity. The chopper was busy trying to pick Chuck's body out of the sea as I was turning on final approach.

For me, the suspense of my predicament was now further heightened by the realization that, because everyone was operating in new and untested territory, fatal mistakes like Chuck's abortive ejection were more than a remote possibility.  And Hell, I had never even seen a picture of a barricade before this flap I thought,

"Watch out Buster or you'll be next!"

As I came onto glide path "in the groove" aft of the ship I saw my first barricade all right. But, what I DID NOT SEE was the mirror, the pilot's only guide to a successful carrier landing. I finally realized that the mirror was obscured behind the huge port barricade stanchion. In the few instants that it took me to figure this out and to get to a point where I could see the mirror I was both off alignment and VERY LOW, not a pretty picture! I was correcting as I skimmed a couple of feet over the ramp end of the ship. I drove the F8 into the net at about 150 MPH. Everything seemed OK until the force of the engagement with the lower horizontal load strap of the barricade suddenly tore off my port landing gear. The F8 instantly pivoted on the wing tip. I hit the burner but it wasn't doing any more flying that day-I was well and truly snagged-hooking and skidding to the port edge of the carrier deck. I was on my way to an unanticipated and highly unwelcome salt-water immersion."

extract by kind permission of John "Crash" Miottel.
The full narrative of John's career and experiences with barricade landings can be found at his web site


LINK

 

5th March 1958


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

143792
NL-404

VF-154 from carrier USS Hancock (CVA-19)

Arrestor hook failure. Barricade landing tore off port landing gear. Went over the side

John "Crash" Miottel
egressed under water from the aircraft. He did not eject.
recovered

Vought

12th March 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143744 VF-96 from carrier USS Midway (CVA-41) Over water in U.S. LTJG G. M. Lindsay ejected.   Vought
3rd April 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 144433
VF-211
"Checkertails"
in GCA pattern at Moffett Field - flame out (fuel pump swallowed O-Ring)
Over land in U.S.
LTJG R. Louie Fisk ejected too low for LTV seat capability and was killed in aircraft   Vought
10th April 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143757 VF-32 from carrier USS Saratoga (CVA-60) Over water in U.S. LT Billy Phillips
1st ejection see also 25th September 1958
Vought
30th April 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143779 VF-154 from carrier USS Hancock (CVA-19). Over water in U.S. LTJG E. W. Madsen ejected   Vought
9th May 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143706 NAF China Lake Over land in U.S. CDR S. N. May ejected   Vought
11th May 1958
USN
F-8A Crusader  144455
VF-211
"Checkertails"
Over land in U.S. LTJG D. W. Wilson ejected   Vought
26th June 1958
USN
F8U-1 Crusader     Over water in U.S. LTJG R. C. Burlingame
ejected
  Vought
10th July 1958
USMC
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143765 VMF251
VMF-334
El Toro
On Fam. 1 and suffered unintended ejection at 20,000 ft. Over Eliot National Forest in U.S.
The rescue helo crashed during the attempted recovery. All were returned to El Toro in a Highway trooper's car.
2LT Harry Black ejected   Vought
16th July 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143712
VF-11
'Red Rippers'
Over land in U.S. LT Jack B. Barnes
ejected

photo via Tom Wilber

Vought
24th July 1958
USN
RF-8A Crusader  145605 VFP-61 Det. Alpha
USS Midway (CVA-41)
Over water off West Coast returning to Midway from Alameda LCDR Len G. Derse
OINC of  VFP-61 Det. Alpha

ejected.
First
 (F8U‑1P) crash ejection
Vought
13th August 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145332 VF-103 in U.S LTJG H. F. Herndon ejected
landed in a tree
  Vought
18th August 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143717 VF-124 U.S. LTJG W. D. Darden ejected
low level - landed in seat
  Vought
4th September 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145407 VF-194 Over land in U.S. LTJG R. R. Warthen ejected   Vought
25th September 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143747 VF-32 from carrier USS Saratoga (CVA-60) in U.S. LT Billy Phillips
2nd ejection from an F-8
see also 10th April 1958
Vought
26th September 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143805
VF-211
"Checkertails"
 from carrier USS Midway (CVA-41)
Over water in Formosa or Okinawa area LTJG D. R. McKee ejected about 5,000 ft after losing main mounts in pitching sea recovery. Recovered by helo. Vought
Regretfully, DR was later killed in 1959 flying with the Blues
6th January 1960
6th November 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143687 VF-NARF Norfolk  Norfolk in U.S. CDR William G. [C.?] Andrews ejected   Vought
17th November 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143763 VF-32 Cecil in U.S. LCDR James David LaHaye ejected
[KIA flying and F-8 on 8th May 1965]
  Vought
19th November 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 146364 VF-194 Fallon in U.S LT K. Krigbaum ejected   Vought
20th November 1958
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145340
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil in U.S. LT R. F. Bradberry ejected   Vought
9th December 1958
USN
F8U-1 Crusader 145341 VMF-334
"The Falcons"
El Toro
During ACM training, U.S
On his Fam II flight (the high speed run) to qualify for
the 1000 MPH club that suffered a supersonic ejection when the canopy
inadvertently separated and the face curtain was activated by the
slip-stream.
1LT W. Pierre Lemond
Lemmond
USAF Exchange Pilot
ejected
  Vought
      1959
   
9th January 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 144460 VF-103 , CVA-59, USS Forrestal Runaway fuel control waited until the plane flamed out at 11,000 feet, ejected and landed at an Italian Arsenal on the island of Sardinia (Italy). Lt. William "Bill" E. Haase
ejected
Vought
21st January 1959
USMC
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145376 VMF-334
El Toro
Crashed in US MAJOR K. G. Fiegener
ejected
  Vought

31st January 1959


USMC

Vought F8 Crusader

145338

El Toro

Crashed in US

CAPT L. L. Lind
Lund

ejected

x

Vought

20th February 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143781
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil
Crashed in US ENSIGN John Terry Kryway
[1st ejection also ejected from an F-8 on 21st October 1961]

photo via Tom Wilber

Vought
23rd March 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 144451 VF-24
NAS Alameda

VF-24/211
??
[see FEEDBACK below]

Crashed Alameda in US following midair collision with F8U-1 !44448

LTJG Herb F. Hoffman
ejected

Vought
 

In Vought F8U losses and ejections 1956-1964, The F8s lost on March 23, 1959 (Hickey and Hoffman) and the F8 lost on 24 April 1959 (Crahan) were indeed F8s, and the squadron was VF-24, out of NAS Alameda. I was at NAS Alameda at the time of  those incidents,  and on May 1 1959 I reported to VF-24, was with the squadron until August 1961. Although the changes in squadron designations and air groups at that time have caused a lot of confusion, I was in Alameda, in F8 squadron VF-24, in Air Group 2 with Pat Crahan, Ed Hickey, and Herb Hoffman, as well as Hank Smith and others. There should be no question about the aircraft or the squadron.

Dan Oswald

Lcdr, USNR Retired

 

Mike, this is a scan of the 1959-60 Midway cruise book picture of Herb Hoffman, who ejected from his VF24 F8U-1 on 23 March 1959 after colliding with Ed Hickey, who also ejected.  I saw Herb last March at a VF-24 reunion of the 1959-60 gang at Hank Smith's home in Monterey, CA.  Hank is the F8U jockey who shows up in your statistics for August 1959, when he got a cold cat shot ride into the Pacific.

Dan 

23rd March 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
144448 VF-24

VF-24/211
??
[see FEEDBACK below]

Mid-air collision with F8U-1 144451. Crashed Alameda in US LT Ed J. Hickey
ejected

Ed Hickey taken 1967 VF-51, CV-19
Vought
 

The squadron listings for Ed Hickey, Herb Hoffman, and Pat Crahan should be changed from VF-211 to VF 24.

Also the background for those ejections are as follows:

The ejections of Hickey and Hoffman were a result of a dog fight with some Air Force F 104's over Mount Hamilton. In that encounter, Hoffman lost sight of his leader, ( Hickey) and ran into him, causing a wing to come off Hickey's F8 and loss of control of Hoffman's F8. As you reported, both ejected safely.

Crahan's incident was the result of fuel starvation. He took off from Fallon NAS towing a gunnery banner. The take off procedure was to leave the wing fuel transfer switch in the off position until about 1000 feet. In addition, to minimize damage to the banner, the climb angle was extremely steep in order to lift the banner from the runway as soon as possible. This was the first banner tow hop for Crahan and that together with the unusual climb procedures required, contributed to him forgetting to turn on the wing fuel transfer switch. When at about 20,000 the fuselage tank ran dry, the engine flamed out, and none of us thought to coach him to turn on the wing fuel transfer switch. He ejected safely.


Lastly, Hank Smith, VF-24. 1959-60, after his cold cat shot off the USS Midway, in July, 1959, tried to eject unsuccessfully under water from his sinking F8 and had to get out manually. He was the first pilot to survive a cold cat shot from an F8. He will give you the BuNo of the F8 when he returns from the present trip to the East Coast. The ejection seat was the Vought which had an envelope of 200 feet 90 knots. The catapult broke half way thru the stroke on the sponson deck and went over the side of the ship at approximately 110 knots but not have enough altitude. ( either 63 or 163 feet). The aircraft exploded on impact with the water, ( wings came off, engine came apart blowing turbine blades upon to the flight deck, the windscreen failed filling the cockpit with water with such force that the oxygen mask of the pilot was pulled to one side forcing water down the throat of the pilot. Note: full story is listed on google under " F8 Cold Cat Shot".


Hank Smith VF-24 1959-60

USS Midway

f8hawk@aol.com

4th April 1959
USMC
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143761 VMF-334 Mid-air collision. Crashed Alameda in US MAJOR T. A. Coleman
ejected
  Vought
24th April 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143769 VF-24

VF-24/211
??
[see FEEDBACK below]

Crashed Fallon in US. LTJG Pat J. Crahan ejected Vought
   
143769 TF-8A   Arlington / The Air Station Flying Museum Wa   Pv 07-01

NAS Moffett Field, California

FEEDBACK

Early ‘59, you have 03/23/59 & 04/24/59 Crusader ejections attributed to VF-211. But, with earlier attributions, you state that VF-24 became VF-211 on 03/08/59, which is true. I was a Capt., USAF Exchange, in VF-24/VF-211 during that time. We were in CAG 2, Alameda, when we were emergency deployed due to the Lebanon and then Formosa incidents. Since the “Lex” wasn’t considered adequate for the Crusader and the Midway didn’t have adequate maintenance for the “1” series missile (F3H-2M, “Demon” – Day Fighter version), which didn’t work anyway, VF-24 & VF-211 swapped Air Groups/ships. We returned in Dec. ‘58, with our “Demons” and since the “new” VF-24 had already formed with F11F-1’s at Moffett, all hands went various directions, but me. Since I was directed duty to VF-24, I moved to NAS Moffett to join the “new” VF-24, flying “Tigers”. But, after awhile, the unit began Air Group training for their next deployment, said that they no longer could afford my flying time and arranged for me to TAD across the field to VF-124 RAG. But, when the “old” VF-211 returned from WestPac, the units did the 03/08/59 name/designation swap, to get them back in their earlier Air Groups. So, at the time of those March & April ejections attributed to VF-211, they were flying F11F-1 “Tigers”. I don’t know who those Crusaders belonged to, but not likely VF-211. As for my TAD, I mostly instructed in the TV-2, but did transition to the F9F-8T. And, due to the graciousness of the VF-124 Skipper, CDR F. X. Timmes, he insisted that I check out and get some flights in the F8U-1 “Crusader” before I returned to the USAF, the end of April, ’59! As a matter of a coincidence, I had my last flight in the Crusader, at Moffett, that day of the 04/24/59 ejection attributed to VF-211.

Regards,

Gene F. Rogge
Lt. Col., USAF (Ret)
ex VF-24/211 Naval Aviator

(entries with ?? amended 28th June 2011)
CAN ANYONE GIVE A DEFINITIVE SQUADRON TO THE AIRCRAFT LISTED ?

29th April 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 144459 VF-196 , USS Ranger CVA-61 unknown - over water LT R. J. Peterson ejected   Vought

-- June 1959

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

145535
NJ

VF-124

x

x

x

x

9th June 1959
USMC
RF-U-1
Crusader
 145619 VMCJ-1 Crashed in US MAJOR J. E. Wilson
ejected
  Vought
18th June 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143820 NATC PAX Crashed in US LT D. B. Pringle
ejected
  Vought
30th June 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145393 VF-194. Crashed in US LT W. D. Stevenson
ejected
  Vought
Sunday
26th July 1959

USMC
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
143696
DC
"Tiger One"
VMF-122
MAG-32
"Crusaders"
Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort

Engine failure, Beaufort NC USA
LTCOL William Henry Rankin
ejected
over VA
remained in the air in his parachute thrown about in a thunderstorm
. Came down in N.C.
Vought
  The events of the LTCOL Rankin's epic ejection are related in his book "the Man Who Rode the Thunder"

26th July 1959


USMC

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

144446?

H&MS-32

 

 

 

Vought

This now seems to be in error. Needs rechecking
                 
28th July 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
145390 VF-24
USS Midway
CVA-41
 

Off the coast of California during a missile
  shoot exercise

LTJG Henry H. "Hank" Smith
egressed under water following three unsuccessful ejection attempts
Vought
  Hank tried to eject unsuccessfully under water from his sinking F8 and had to get out manually. He was the first pilot to survive a cold cat shot from an F8. He will give you the BuNo of the F8 when he returns from the present trip to the East Coast. The ejection seat was the Vought which had an envelope of 200 feet 90 knots. The catapult broke half way thru the stroke on the sponson deck and went over the side of the ship at approximately 110 knots but not have enough altitude. ( either 63 or 163 feet). The aircraft exploded on impact with the water, ( wings came off, engine came apart blowing turbine blades upon to the flight deck, the windscreen failed filling the cockpit with water with such force that the oxygen mask of the pilot was pulled to one side forcing water down the throat of the pilot.

145390 (VF-24) went over the side of USS Midway after bad catapult shot Jul 28, 1959. Pilot was able to jettison canopy and get out of the plane before it sank.

 



Regarding my experience of a Cold Cat Shot aboard USS Midway, July 29,
1959

The reference of trying to eject under water from the the sinking F8
mentions parts of the experience.  The whole story of the event was
published by the Naval Aviation Museum Foundation.  If you would like
to include that get back to me and I will send it to you.  I have had a
number of people ask about the details of the event and the story
covers not only the mechanical aspect of the event but the
psychological as well.

For the visitors to the USS Hornet museum, where I am a docent
volunteer, the elements of that event help to illustrate the human
experience aspect of ship board operations.

Hank Smith VF-24 1959=60
USS Midway
 

3rd August 1959


US

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

?

 

 

 

 

 

10th August 1959


USN

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

 

VF-124

 

 

 

 

11th August 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 144440 VMF-122 Crashed
over Atlantic off S.C coast. Fired sidewinder with non-propulsive attachments still on. A/C caught fire
1LT John E. Glenn ejected-chute failed to deploy. fatal   Vought

18th August 1959


USN

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

145524

VF-154

 

 

 

 

24th August 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145465 NATC PAX. USS Independence
CVA-62
unknown LCDR R. D. Pollard ejected   Vought

25th August 1959


USN

Vought F8 Crusader

 

USS Independence

Norfolk VA. Crashed into aft section of carrier
1 killed
[was this the pilot ?

pilot ???
fate not determined

 

 

10th September 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145414 VF-124 Crashed Moffett in US LTJG J. S. Hellman ejected   Vought
23rd September 1959
USN
F8U-2
F-8C Crusader
 145556 VX-3 Crashed Oceana in US LCDR R. H. Jester ejected   Vought
7th October 1959
USN
RF-8-1 Crusader  145638 VCP-61
USS Hancock
CVA-19
  LTCDR H. B. Harlow
ejected
  Vought

29th October 1959


USN

Vought F8U-1P Crusader


145610

VCP-63-Det M
NAS Cecil

Mid-air collision near NAS Cecil

LT W. G. Offerman ejected in a spin

[see also 22nd May 1961]

 

Vought

29th October 1959


USN

Vought F8U-1P Crusader


145606

VCP-63-Det M
NAS Cecil

Mid-air collision near NAS Cecil

LT. Baggett
ejected
   
30th October 1959
USN
RF-8-1 Crusader

146853

VFP-63-Det M Crashed Miramar in US LTJG Paul Sabino Tarantino
23
USNR
ejected
  Vought
FEEDBACK

".   .   .   My father was a F8 Crusader driver.   .   .    His name was LTJG Paul S. Tarantino. He was killed over Poway CA on Oct 30th 1959 on a training exercise. He took off from Miramar. He went into a flat spin and had to eject, and the ejection chute did not deploy. He was laid to rest nearby at Ft Rosecran in San Diego.    .   .   .   He was only 23 years old when he died."

Thank You,
Paul Tarantino
in email 3rd March 2012

   
12th November 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 145373 VF-174 Crashed Leeward Point in US LCDR H. J. Post
ejected
  Vought
13th November 1959
USN
F8U-1P  Crusader  146840 VFP-62, CVA-42, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt   LTJG Phillip J. Smith
[see also 16th July 1960]
  Vought
17th November 1959
USN
F-8C Crusader  145573 VF-84 Crashed Leeward Point in US LT J. D. Anthony ejected   Vought
21st December 1959
USN
 F8U‑1
 Crusader
 143798 VF-124 Crashed in US LT C. E. Southwick ejected OK   Vought
Is this Charles Everett Southwick who ejected from an F-4B during the Vietnam War on 24 April 1967 and again on 14 May 1967 and became a POW??? Yes
      1960
                 
DETAILS OF LOSS NEEDED

Melvin H. Sautter

10/59-8/60 VMF-451, Avionics Officer, El Toro, CA.

(F8U-2).

(1) Deployed TAD 10 Mar 60 with three F8U-2s and one F3D-2 for OPEVAL of Hawk surface-to-air missile defense capabilities at White Sands Proving Grounds, NM. Conducted unrestricted altitudes, closure rates, and direction of attacks to determine Hawk radar acquisition parameters. Operation terminated when F3D+ crashed after striking a cattle gate. Both crew members ejected without injury. OPEVAL identified several Hawk engineering and procedural changes required to attain combat readiness.

+Skynight

 

                 
7th January 1960
USN
Crusader F-8C 145571 VF-84
USS Independence
CVA-62
Crashed in the US LTJG R. E. Box ejected   Vought
8th January 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8A 143745
WV or WU
VMF-334
"The Falcons"
Crashed El Toro in the US LT William C "Bill" Mirams
ejected at about 250 feet, nose down.
[personal testimony - 7/April/2006]
Vought Seat with recent mods. to improve performance
12th January 1960
USN
Vought F8U-2 Crusader 145437   Cecil LTJG J. J. Smith Jr.
ejected
  Vought
Thursday 21st January 1960
USMC
F-8U-1 Crusader   VMF-334
"The Falcons"
El Toro
Landing/taxi accident. Returning from routine night operations collided
on Runway 25 left at El Toro
1st Lt. Tom Troxell
25
No ejection.
Suffered severe burns and multiple fractures.
Died on Sunday 24th January at Camp Pendleton Hospital, California
  Vought
Thursday 21st January 1960
USMC
F-8U-2 Crusader   VMF-334
"The Falcons"
El Toro
Landing/taxi accident. Returning from routine night operations collided
on Runway 25 left at El Toro
Pilot
uninjured
Ground egress
  Vought
 

Mike, I do not know if you are only interested in ejections for your
work or if you are compiling all F8 hull losses.
There were two F8s lost in a landing/taxi accident at El Toro during
1959. Two VFM 334 F8s returning from routine night operations collided
on Runway 25 left at El Toro. 1st Lt. Tom Troxell was badly burned and
lost his life shorly thereafter. There was also a VMF 334 Air Force
exchange pilot on his Fam II flight (the high speed run) to qualify for
the 1000 MPH club that suffered a supersonic ejection when the canopy
inadvertently separated and the face curtain was activated by the
slip-stream. He was not injured.

Respectfully submitted,

Skip Eglet
VMF323 1958-1960
in email 18th March 2012
CAN ANYONE FILL IN FURTHER DETAILS - NAMES, PILOT PHOTOS?

27th January 1960


USMC

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

146921
VM

VMF-451

x

x

x

x

5th February 1960


USMC

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

145505
WT

 

 

no ejection noted in files

 

Vought

5th February 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8C 146954
VM-13
VMF-451 Engine quit just West of ELCentro Ca en route to t NAS Dallas CAPT Hal W. Vincent
ejected
about 3500 feet
Vought
17th February 1960
USN
Crusader F-8A 144441 VF-124 Crashed Yuma in the US LTJG J. M. Burns ejected   Vought
17th March 1960
USN
Crusader F-8B  145500 VMF-232 Crashed Kaneohe in the US 1LT D. W. House ejected   Vought

24th March 1960


USN

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

145494
NP-2??

VA-216

x

x

x

x

25th March 1960
also seen as 23rd

USN
Crusader RF-8A 146841 VFP-63
USS Hancock
CVA-19
Crash area unknown LTJG L. H. Roecher
Roeckner

ejected
  Vought
29th March 1960
USN
Crusader  F8U-2 (F-8C)  145552 VF-84
USS Independence
CVA-62
Bad Cat shot LTJG Claude Douglas "Doug" Clower
ejected

[ejected a second time from F-4B 150997, VF-151, USS Coral Sea on 19th November 1967 and became POW]

Vought
14th April 1960
USN
Crusader  F8U-2 (F-8C) 143788   Leeward Point 2/LT Jack L. Omer ejected   Vought
15th April 1960
USN
Crusader F-8C 146978 VF-84, CVA-19 Crashed Oceana in the US CAPT J. R. McMamara
USAF
ejected
  Vought

22nd April 1960


USN

Vought F8U-1P Crusader

146885

VCP-63

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

29th April 1960


USN

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

145564
NG

VF-91

x

x

x

x

17th May 1960
USN
Crusader F-8A 142411 VMF-312 Crashed Beaufort in the US MAJOR R. S. Rash ejected   Vought
2nd June 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145508 VMF-232 Crashed Kaneohe in the US 1/LT J. E. Herlocker
ejected
  Vought
Tuesday 7th June 1960
USMC
YF8U-2N
F-8C Crusader
 147039 NATC PAX Crashed Patuxent in the US CAPT Francis M. Parsons
Euclid, Ohio
ejected
  One was a  Martin-Baker seat the other was a Vought seat - which was which
Swerved following catapult launch at air station with one wing low and flew into a helicopter waiting to taking off. Pilot seriously injured, two on helicopter were killed and two others on the ground.
Tuesday 7th June 1960
USN
F8U-1E
F-8B Crusader
 145418 VF-154, CVA-43, USS Coral Sea Crash area unknown LT R. C. Doan ejected  
13th June 1960
USMC
F8U-1E
F-8B Crusader
 145484 VMF-235 Crashed Beaufort in the US 1/LT K. E. Soesbe
ejected
  Vought

6th July 1960

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

147006
[or is the BuNo below for this loss]

x

x

x

x

x

6th July 1960
USN
Crusader F-8C  147014
[or is the above BuNo for this loss]
  crashed Moffett in the US LtJG Charles David "Dave" Metzler
[1st ejection, also ejected from an F-8 23rd October 1961, ejected a third time from an F-8 on 21st June 1971 but was killed]
  Martin-Baker
Thanks to Rat Wood & Cole Pierce for additional information
16th July 1960
also seen as 16th

USN
F8U-1P
RF-8A
Crusader
 146842  VFP-62, CVA-42, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt   LTJG Phillip J. Smith
[see also 13th November 1959]
photo via VFP-62 web site
Vought

1st August 1960


USN

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

145589
NG

VF-91

x

x

x

x

possibly 1961 Aug 60  F8U1 Capt  W. T. O'Rourke Near Iwakuni Japan.fatal no attempt to eject
3rd August 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8A  145405
WU
VMF-334 Routine training flight. Crashed in the US west of Toro Peak, 10 miles south west of Quinta, CA LTCOL R. L. Thomas
ejected
killed
[confirm]
  Vought
4th August 1960
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146868 VFP-62, CVA-42, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt   LT R. W. Green ejected   Vought
17th August 1960
USN
Crusader F-8A
[F8U-1]
 143741 VF-124
NAS Fallon, Nevada
Crashed in the US in a dry lake bed northwest of Lovelock CDR Leslie O. Fortner
ejected
  Vought
26th August 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8A  145355 VMF-334 Crashed Odessa in the US 1/LT J. W. Lounsbury
ejected
  Vought

22nd September 1960


USN

Vought F8 Crusader

145350
203


VF-62
U.S.S. Shangri La
Link

Commander J. E. Davis
was safely recovered

Vought

  US Navy Photo courtesy Bruce Nason via Ken Jack, webmaster www.vfp62.com
6th October 1960
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146872 VFP-62. CVA-60 USS Saratoga   LTJG G. P. Modrak ejected   Vought
10th October 1960
USN
Crusader F-8C  147019 VF-194 Crashed Reno in the US Cdr. C. E. Rich ejected   Martin-Baker
11th October 1960
USN
Crusader F-8A  143740
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Crashed Cecil in the US LTJG P. A. Polski ejected   Vought

18th November 1960


USMC

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

145436
DW

VMF-251

x

x

x

x

17th November 1960
USN
Crusader F-8A  145374
VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"
CVA-16
USS Lexington
Crashed in the US CDR H. C. Lovegrove
ejected
  Vought
21st November 1960
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146900 VFP-63 operational accident. Crashed Miramar in the US LT J. R. Batzler ejected   Vought
26th November 1960
USN
Crusader F-8B  145496 VF-32. CVA-60 USS Saratoga   LT Robert Harper Shumaker
1st ejection
[see also
11th February 1965 ejected from an F-8 and became a POW]
Vought
1st December 1960
USN
Crusader RF-8A  145630 VFP-62, CVA-60 USS Saratoga   LTJG T. L. P. Cook ejected   Vought
2nd December 1960
USMC
Crusader F-8C  146958 VMF-333 Crashed in the US 1/LT B. B. Roberge
ejected
  Vought
                 
3rd January 1961
USN
Crusader YF-8C  147040 NATC PAX Crashed Paxutent in US LCDR W. F. Whalen ejected   Vought
11th January 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8B
[F8U1]
 145447 VMF-312
Atsugi
Ejected over Mt. Fuji in Japan during tactics flight 1/LT Gene R. Merritt ejected   One was a  Martin-Baker seat the other was a Vought seat - which was which
11th January 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  147017 VF-103, CVA-59 USS Forrestal   LTJG D. M. Brookes
Brooks
 
ejected
 

17th January 1961


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

14367
NF

VA-51

x

x

x

x

30th January 1961


USN

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

146927

VF-142

x

x

x

x

31st January 1961


USN

Vought F8 Crusader

143808

x

x

x

x

x

1st February 1961
USN
Crusader F-8A  145366 VF-51 Crashed Yuma in US Lt. Cdr. A. C. O'Neal ejected   Martin-Baker
22nd February 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  146923 VF-103
USS Forrestal
CVA-59
  DETAILS OF THIS LOSS NOT CLEAR
DID IT HAPPEN ???
   
23rd February 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  146988 VF-124 Crashed Yuma in US LTJG K. J. Jackson ejected   Vought
Low Level
4th March 1961
USN
F8U-1
Crusader
143808   Crashed Yuma in US LTJG R. E. Jacobsen ejected at less than 100 feet.
He died three hours later
  Martin-Baker
 
 
There were two crashes at Beaufort in '61 or '62 that are not listed. One was a USAF Captain exchange pilot flying with VMF 235. Flamed out on final approach and ejected, no injuries.
The other was Capt Eddings of VMF 122, same situation, flamed out on final approach, sucessfully kept plane from hitting base housing and did not eject, killed.
 

 

27th April 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8B
[F8U-1
Crusader]
 145428 VMF-312, CVA-41, USS Midway hitting round down on USS Midway CAPT M. P. Cady ejected   Vought
Low Level
28th April 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8A  145377 VMF-333  in US 2/LT R. S. Welz ejected outside envelope of the seat and was killed   Martin-Baker
1st May 1961
USN
Crusader F-8B  145452 VF-154
????
in Philippine Islands

CAPT P. L. Elliott
USMC
ejected
[F8U-1]

  Vought
Low Level
1st May 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145427
DR
VMF-312,
CVA-43,
USS Coral Sea
  MAJOR Richard S. Rash ejected
[F8U-1E]
  Vought
 

Hello, I hope you are still at this address and reading your mail.

I can clear up the puzzle of who was in which of the two aircraft that you have listed as experiencing losses or ejections from F8 Crusaders on May 1, 1961.

The VMF-312 F8B (F8U-1), Navy BuNo 147427, which was lost from the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) on that date was piloted by Major Richard S. Rash, USMC. I know this because I was the pilot of the rescue helicopter that fished him out of the South China Sea after he ejected. A photograph of Major Rash (center), myself (in the pilot's seat) and my rescue aircrewman, Petty Officer Richard Skye, is attached.

I was a Lieutenant (junior grade) at the time and serving as Officer in Charge of the Helicopter Utility Squadron One (HU-1) detachment assigned to the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43). Major Rash was serving as Commanding Officer of Marine Fighter Squadron (VMF) 312 and was leading a division of Crusaders on a mission to cover a couple of photo F8s who were engaged in mapping an area of S.E. Asia. Major Rash ultimately was promoted to Colonel and passed on several years ago.

Regards,

James A. Magee
Captain, US Navy (Ret)
in email 27th April 2012

2nd May 1961


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

145367
NF

VF-124

x

x

x

x

6th May 1961
USN
Crusader F-8B  145424 VF-124 Crashed Nellis in US. Ensign P. D. Farley ejected   Martin-Baker
8th May 1961
USN
F-8 Crusader 147037     Lt. Cdr. P. Montilardi
Mongilardi

ejected
  Martin-Baker
22nd May 1961
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146839 VFP-62, CVA-42, USS Franklin D. Roosevelt   LT W. G. Offerman
ejected
[see also 29th October 1959]
  Vought
Low Level

2nd June 1961

Vought F8 Crusader

146923

x

x

x

x

x

12th June 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  147003 VF-124 Crashed Moffett in US LCDR J. A. Schneider
Scheibner
ejected
  Martin-Baker
22nd June 1961
USN
F8U-2 Crusader 146923 USS Forrestal   LT P. J. Brown ejected safely   Martin-Baker
17th August 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  145570 VF-191
Barbers  Point Naval Air Station, Oahu
engine suffered catastrophic failure during take  in Hawaii. Lt. Kenneth Corica ejected successfully   Martin-Baker
                 
26th August 1961
USN
Crusader F-8A BuNo 143708 VF-211
Punched out over Crater Lake, OR and actually landed in the lake, being fished out soon after by rangers Lt. (jg) William Boardman
ejected
[second ejection, see also
15th April 1959 when he ejected from a TV-2]

[personal testimony]
 
Vought
Low Level

30th August 1961

Vought F8 Crusader

145439

x

x

x

x

x

30th  August 1961
USN
F8U-1P
RF-8A Crusader
 145618 VFP-62
Cecil Field
Jacksonville, Florida
Over the Okeefenokee swamp. LTJG Gerald L. "Jerry" Coffee
ejected

[Also ejected from RA-5C Vigilante 3rd February 1966, captured. POW]

Martin-Baker
9th September 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8C  146982 VMF334 RAG training. Material failure, wing broke at fold on a gunnery hop out of Yuma in US Lt. William H. Juvonen
ejected

Controlled ejection
  Martin-Baker
11th September 1961
USN
F8U-1P
RF-8A
Crusader
146851
PP
VAP-61 Det Bravo
USS Ticonderoga
CVA-14
Heavily damaged when making a
barrier landing.
The nose gear was trailing and the port
gear sheared off when aircraft boltered on the first pass.

 


Lt George A. Canon
[OIC VAP-61 Det. B]
suffered a broken back but ultimately resumed flying status
no ejection
  Martin-Baker
VCP-61 redesignated VAP-61 on Jul.1, 1961
19th September 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  145578 VF-194
CVA-61
USS Ranger
  LCDR G. H. Holloman ejected   Martin-Baker
20th September 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8C  146912 VMF-323 Crashed El Toro in US. Capt. L H.Holmes
ejected
  Martin-Baker
6th October 1961
USN
 RF-8A Crusader
F8U-1P
145634 VFP-62
Oceana.
Cockpit fire. After the pilot's ejection the
aircraft continued in flight for over one hour and had to be brought down over the water by
a Sidewinder missile fired from another fighter
LCDR Charles H. Price
ejected
near Fentress, Va
  Vought
Low Level
FEEDBACK Thanks to Gary Williams for providing the BuNo of the F-8A lost on 6th October 1962
in email 28th April 2013
16th October 1961
USN
Crusader F-8A
F8U-1
  144452
VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"
 Crashed Yuma n US. LTJG William  M Boardman 
[third  ejection, see also
15th April 1959 when he ejected from a TV-2]
and second ejection
on 26th August 1961
][personal testimony]
Martin-Baker
16th October 1961
USMC
F-8C Crusader
F8U-2
 147033
DN
VMF-333 Crashed Beaufort in US. 1st Lt. James E. Strawn ejected at high speed Martin-Baker
17th October 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8C 146949
WU
VMF-334 Crashed El Toro in US. Major R. B. Haines ejected   Martin-Baker
 

 

21st October 1961


USN
Crusader F8U-1   145375
[145357 ?]

AB 212

VF-11
'Red Rippers'
CVA-42
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt
  Lt. John Terrance "Terry" Kryway
[2nd ejection also ejected from an F-8 on 20th February 1959] ejected after he directed the aircraft off the deck due to fire
caused by heavy landing
broke wheel strut. Famous sequence of photographs [by photographer mate L. J. Cera]

photo via Tom Wilber

Martin-Baker

Stills from the famous film sequence
Visit Rod Rogers web site for the complete set
23rd October 1961
USN
Crusader F-8A  143794 VF-191 Atsugi in Japan. LT Charles David "Dave" Metzler
ejected

[2nd ejection, also ejected from an F-8 on 6th July 1960  and 23rd October 1961, ejected a third time from an F-8 on 21st June 1971 but was killed]
  Martin-Baker
2nd November 1961
USN
Crusader F-8C  146926 VF-194 Atsugi in Japan LTJG R. L. Martin
ejected
  Martin-Baker
2nd November 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8A  147024 VMF-333 Beaufort in US 1/LT. Joseph "Joe" P. McDonald
ejected
  Martin-Baker
FEEDBACK

I am listed as  ejecting on November 2nd   1961 while with VMF-333 in U.S. (actually, within two miles of base at   Beaufort, S.C.) under name 1st Lt. J.P. MacDonald (actually, I'm J. (for Joseph, better "Joe") F. McDonald. I popped out some two weeks  ahead of 1st Lt. C. W. Vogt (November 15,1961), a member of the same   group (who later served as Chairman of the U.S. National 
Transportation Safety Board from 1992 - 1994).
    I was two weeks behind 1st Lt. James E. Strawn's supersonic ejection   on October 16, 1961, when he was my wingman in the manoeuvres described   in his amazing account linked to your write-up of his ejection. I am   in sporadic contact with him through a larger group of mostly former VMF-333 F8 jocks.
 Love to help.   .   .   .

Joe

in email 28th October 2009
[name spelling corrected 28/10/09]

 

12th November 1961
USN
Crusader F-8D  148653 VF-154, CVA-43, USS Coral Sea over water Lt. (jg) J. A. James
ejected
  Martin-Baker
15th November 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8C  146922 VMF-323 Engine failure, Kaneohe in Hawaii 1st LT C. W. Vogt
ejected
  Martin-Baker
30th November 1961
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146850 VFP-63 Miramar in US LT Lawrence King "L. K"  Dalrymple
ejected
see also 13th June 1963
  Martin-Baker
4th December 1961
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145448 VMF-312
Atsugi
Wing failure during tactic flight in Japan. Landed after coming through thatched roof of Japanese police station Capt. Allen Leroy Frucci
ejected
NW of Tokyo
No injuries

[Allen Frucci also ejected on 29th October 1962 from a USAF F-100D while on a tour of exchange]

Martin-Baker

FEEDBACK

"Bail out on 4 Dec 61. Pilots name -Allen Leroy Frucci - Flying out of Atsugi while a member of VMF-312 ( the best and wildest crusader squadron of them all) He was in a hassle with some of our other folks and pulled the wing off. Ejected safely and came down through the roof of a Japanese police station.  Just another day in dear old 312."

Bob Wiedemann

5th December 1961

Vought F8U-2N Crusader

146845
NH


VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"

x

x

x

x

7th December 1961


USMC

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

145529
WT

VMF-232

x

x

x

x

Sunday 10th December 1961
USN
Crusader F-8D  147915 VF-32
"Swordsmen"
CVA-60
USS Saratoga
During night landing on carrier hit the back end of the deck. LCDR Robert Wilbur Paige ejected
on contact with deck of carrier. Insufficient time for the seat to leave the aircraft. Pilot
did not survive
Martin-Baker Mk.5

FEEDBACK

"I was onboard the Sara with VAH-9 & remember this night time accident very well. Happened at Taps. Night trap. Fatal aircraft accident, pilot killed, back end of ship in flames. Went to GQ & when I emerged into Hanger Bay 3, filled with smoke, flames aft, went to GQ station forward of HB 3. "

Johnnie Klay
AQB Heavy 9
in email 13th May 2013

13th December 1961

Vought F8U-1P Crusader

146859

VFP-63

x

x

x

x

15th December 1961
USN
Crusader F-8D  147900
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
 Cecil in US LT W. A. Updike ejected   Martin-Baker
25th January 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8A  144442
???
 
Miramar in US 1st Lt. H. M. Spann ejected   Martin-Baker
8th February 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145493 VMF-232
CVA-19
over water I.Lt. D. G. Doherty ejected   Martin-Baker
16th February 1962
USN
Crusader RF-8A  146887 VFP-62, CVAN- 65 over water Lt. [LCDR] H. H. Love
ejected
  Martin-Baker
27th February 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A  145396 VF-124 , CVA- collided during join up in US

1st Lt. C. P Jackson
ejected

  Martin-Baker
27th February 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8A 146975   collided during join up in US Lt.(jg) R. G. Bengston
ejected
 

Is this the same pilot who ejected
14th May 1963
&
21st September 1964

  Martin-Baker

5th March 1962


USMC

Vought F8 Crusader

146896
FM

VMCJ-1

x

 

x

x

5th March 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A  145388 VU-4 Oceana in US

Lt. (jg) T. H. Godber
ejected

  Martin-Baker
 
8th March 1962
USN
Crusader F-8C  146906 VF-103 Leeward Point in US LCDR A. E. Westmoreland ejected   Martin-Baker
9th March 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A  145403 VF-191 Yuma in US LCDR J. L. Snyder
ejected
  Martin-Baker

16th March 1962


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

145323
NM

VF-191

x

x

x

x

26th March 1962
USN
Crusader F-8C  146962
WU
VMF-334
CVA-34 USS Oriskany
 in US. 1/Lt. B. J. Bertram
ejected
  Martin-Baker
28th March 1962
USMC
Crusader
F8U-1P
RF-8A
 146822
CY
VMCJ-2  Cherry Point in US CAPT R. W. Tucker ejected photo in file - I think Martin-Baker
2nd April 1962
USN
Crusader
F8U-1P
RF-8A
 146857 VFP-63
Det. L
Cubi Point in US LTJG S. W. Betts ejected   Martin-Baker

3rd April 1962


USN

Vought F8U-1 Crusader

143774
JF

VU-4

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

13th April 1962
USMC
Crusader RF-8A  146875 VMCJ-3 El Toro in US Col. H Williams
ejected
landed in 3 feet of water and separated from seat
  Martin-Baker or Vought
???
21st April 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145485 VMF-122 Roos Roads in US
Puerto Rico.
2/LT K. L. Weller
ejected
while inverted
killed.
  Martin-Baker
 
 
There were two crashes at Beaufort in '61 or '62 that are not listed. One was a USAF Captain exchange pilot flying with VMF 235. Flamed out on final approach and ejected, no injuries.
The other was Capt Eddings of VMF 122, same situation, flamed out on final approach, successfully kept plane from hitting base housing and did not eject, killed.

Does anyone have further information on these losses ?
contact Mike mbenshar@aol.com

24th April 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A
or
F-8D [F8U-2N]
 143709 VF-32
USS Saratoga
CV-60
Cecil in US LCDR William T. Harvey ejected   Martin-Baker

25th April 1962


USN

Vought F8U-2E Crusader

148709
AE-201


VF-132
USS Constellation
Link

Ramp strike,during night landing, Diverted to Guantanamo Bay Cuba - crash landed

Lt R. Loomis
OK

x

x

  US Navy Photo courtesy Bruce Nason via Ken Jack, webmaster www.vfp62.com
30th April 1962
USN
Crusader F-8D

[F8U‑2N]

 148683

AE 2

 VF‑132
CVA-64

      Caribbean, damaged in night bolter

Cdr. G. C. Watkins ejected immediately and was picked up by destroyer

  Martin-Baker

Thursday 3rd May 1962


USMC

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

146924
WU

or
AK

VMF-251
CVG-10
"Thunderbolts"

also seen as
VMF-334
"Falcons"
USS Shangri-la
CVA-38

Went over the edge during landing.

 Captain Harry H. Grünwald, Jr.
killed


VMF(AW)-513

"Flying Nightmares"

Martin-Baker

  VMF-251 was provided with "second hand" F8U-1E Crusaders for the day fighter requirement for the USS Shangri-La.
The USS Shangri La was on a seven month deployment to the Mediterranean leaving on 7th February 1962 to 28th August 1962 and returning to MCAS Beaufort in September 1962. Carried Tailcode AK during this time.

FEEDBACK

My father, Capt. Harry H. Grünwald, Jr, was lost at sea on May 3, 1962.

His Crusader landed perfectly on CV38, USS Shangri-la. While taxiing his tires contacted oil on the deck. Upon losing traction his F8 slid to the edge of the carrier. While his plane teetered on the edge Capt. Grunwald attempted to exit the cockpit. The carrier's skipper ordered Capt. Grunwald to remain strapped in and to close the canopy as the Navy tried to recover his plane

The plane eventually slid into the Mediterranean Sea. On May 9, 1969 a fisherman off the coast of Sicily discovered Capt. Grünwald. He's buried at Arlington Natl. Cemetery.

Sincerely,
Erik Grünwald
in email 2nd December 2012

USMC VMF-334, at MCAS El Toro, CA.  ???

 

I was a Marine Corps aviation  Hydraulics Mechanic  in VMF-251, and served aboard the USS Shangri-La, CVA-38, in the Mediterranean in 1962 for seven months. Our CO  was Lt. Col. Ernest Poor.
In viewing your site on F-8  Crusader ejections, I noted the shipboard accident that claimed the  life on Marine Captain, Harry H. Grunwald on May 3, 1962, which  happened on my 20th birthday. I also served in VMF-251  with Captain Grunwald in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba during the summer of 1961 and on our home base, MCAS Beaufort, SC.

I made  note of the e-mail below from his son, Erik Grunwald supplying information concerning his father, Captain
Grunwald's accident.  
The accident as I recall occurred in early afternoon on a brilliantly sunny day in moderately choppy seas. After landing  successfully, Capt. Grunwald was taxiing forward to the starboard side of the USS Shangri-La and away  
from the arresting  cables and into the area of the still somewhat hot and steaming  catapults. The catapult area was hot,  
greasy and slick since we had  just launched several aircraft prior to Capt Grunwald's landing. As  Capt. Grunwald was being taxied forward over the catapult area of the  forward deck, the ship as rolling port to starboard and somewhat  fore and aft as well. As Capt. Grunwald taxied forward he was given  the "double clenched fist" brake sign from the deckhand  and as he engaged the F-8's brakes rather suddenly, the carrier simultaneously rolled to starboard and his aircraft slid  to the edge of the deck and then went over the side and as it hit  the protruding gun tub, (which were still on carriers of that vintage), it  completely flipped the  plane prior to
the F-8 hitting the water, in  an upright  position.  
Prior to braking and the aircraft sliding  and going over the edge, Capt. Grunwald apparently had raised his  helmet visor and loosened his pilot's harness which allowed more movement  of his body within the cockpit, and the cockpit's canopy was  open and tethered by a nylon strap. Eyewitnesses stated that the plane did not sink immediately and that Captain Grunwald was visible  in the cockpit as the rescue divers went into the water from the  "Angel" helicopter. The rescue divers who were approaching the plane said that  he looked unconcious and that his face was bloody  from apparently hitting the radarscope projection that would have  been immediately in front of him. That observation, however, was made from some yards away and as they began to approach the  plane for a possible rescue, the aircraft suddenly disappeared  below the water. The aircraft's J57 jet engine was still running  when the plane slid over the edge of the ship and hit the water  with a lot of force. Even though the plane was upright, by virtue of  the  engine still running it would have sucked a lot of water into it's large air intake, which would have severely lessened it's  buoyancy and reduced the time for a potential rescue. We apparently were operating in a very deep part of the Mediterranean Sea.  
I remember that accident as if it happened yesterday as it killed a very fine Marine Corps officer and pilot. Capt. Grunwald  
was an  exceptionally "squared away" Marine and served with the highest sense of military professionalism and courage.  
He was also  a very polite man and a pleasure to serve with!

From his son's  rather recent e-mail, I did not realize that his body was  recovered over seven years later. I am glad that Capt. Grunwald has had an honorable burial at Arlington Natl. Cemetery. If he would  permit me, I would like to be able to contact his son, Erik Grunwald.

Charles W. Cathey,
[Charles was put in contact with Erik]

I, along with another Marine in my fighter squadron VMF-251, organized two successful reunions of the enlisted men and officers who served together in 1961 through 1964 in Beaufort, SC. Those reunions both took place in Atlanta, GA in 1997 and again in 2000. Capt. Harry H. Grunwald was among those departed Marines whom we remembered and honored.
Thank you for your posting and your interest in the F-8U Crusader. Our  
fellow Crusader squadrons in Beaufort were VMF-333 (The Shamrocks), (next door to us), and VMF-122, (the
Crusaders) and VMF-235. We, (VMF-251) were The Thunderbolts. In late 1964 or early 1965  some months after I left  
four years of active duty, our squadron began flying the F-4 Phantom.

Today the squadron designation is VMFA and they fly the F-18 Hornet.
Thanks again!
Best, Charles

----------------------------------------------------------------------

There are two pilots of F-8's listed in your posting that ejected successfully, both in 1963, that were in

VMF-251 when I was still there. One was Lt. Col. K. C. (Kenny) Palmer, who became our Commanding Officer

after we returned from the 1962 Med-Cruise. Palmer's ejection happened in early 1963, and a 2nd Lt. W. A. James

who ejected later that year in NAS Roosevelt Roads, Puerto Rico after his air bottle blew up in a compartment aft

of the cockpit.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

I have been looking for a posting of an accident that killed a Major Miller, (VMF-235) when he struck the round

down of (I think) the carrier USS Lexington during a landing attempt at night. I think that it occurred in 1963, but

perhaps it was 1964. VMF-235 was a fellow F-8 squadron based at MCAS, Beaufort. I believe that Major Miller

was the XO of that squadron.

Charles

 

7th May 1962
USN
F8U-2 Crusader  145567 VF-194 Yuma in US LTJG Otto Burgdorf
ejected
  Martin-Baker
8th May 1962
USN
F-8C Crusader  147013 VF-24
(Red) Checkertails
USS Midway
CVA-41
  LTJG Barry E. Kunkel
ejected
[personal testimony]
Martin-Baker
 

Hi.  This is a great site. You have done a lot of work, much appreciated. I was in F8U squadron VF-24 on the Midway for both the 1959-1960 and 1960-1961 cruises, and know many of the pilots who were on the 1962 cruise in that squadron.  From 1959 and until several years after I left the squadron in August 1961, the squadron flew F8s, and the vertical stabilizer had a red and white checkered stripe painted near the top. The squadron during that time was known at the Red Checkertails. The squadron name was changed to the Renegades some time after VF-24 left the Midway in 1964. The entries-- 8 May 1962, F8, VF-24, USS Midway, Ltjg Barry Kunkel, and

1962, F8, VF-24, USS Midway, Lt George Clark (entry immediately following Kunkle's)--should both show the squadron name Red Checkertails, not Renegades.

Nothing but a small change, not important in the grand scheme of things, but I hope it helps.

 

Dan Oswald

Lcdr Retired

USNR

?? ?? 1962
Date needed

USN
F-8 Crusader   VF-24
(Red) Checkertails
USS Midway
CVA-41
Night Flight Ramp strike Lt. George Clark
ejection mechanism failed
  Martin-Baker

 

You have a F-3H Demon ramp strike aboard Midway in 1962 ascribed to VF-21 pilot George Clark. I made the ‘61 and ‘62 Midway deployments in VF-21 and George Clark was not a member of that squadron. But there was a Lt. George Clark in VF-24 flying the F-8 who struck the ramp and then was unable to eject because of seat failure. However he got safely airborne and made and a successful barricade landing. I was the tower observer that night and witnessed the entire event.

And then there is the odd case of  VF-24 F-8 pilot Ltjg. Barry Kunkel on the same Midway CVW-2 deployment and is on your F-8 list. On the night of May 8, 1962 I was taxied to the port bow after landing and parked angle-out style. VF-24 C.O. D. Henderson landed behind me and had just taxied into place alongside me when I opened my canopy. Suddenly I heard a popping sound and seconds later was hit by a shower of plexiglass. Barry Kunkel, Henderson’s wingman, had struck the ramp and ejected immediately He separated from the Martin-Baker seat and his chute deployed just before he landed on the flight deck. His seat then struck and shattered Henderson’s canopy. Henderson escaped injury because he was bending over to pick his kneeboard which he had dropped. Kunkel landed on the flight deck immediately in front of Henderson’s F-8 which was still powered up. Kunkel’s chute was sucked into the F-8 intake and as Kunkel was being pulled toward a gruesome death, two flight deck personnel grabbed him and one cut the shroud lines with his knife thus freeing a shaken Kunkel. Kunkel broke his hip and that ended his deployment. He was taken to sick bay and the senior medical officer had to go to the bridge to convince Midway’s captain that Kunkel was indeed aboard and not in the water.

Cdr. John Newlin, USN (Ret)
in email 28th July 2013

 

  web bio
22nd May 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A  145375 VF-62 Cecil in US LT W. F. Heiss ejected   Martin-Baker

23rd May 1962


USMC

Vought F8U-1E Crusader

145464
WT

VMF-232

x

x

x

x

22nd June 1962
USN
F-8B Crusader  145541 VMF-312 El Toro in US Major L. A. Seipp ejected   Martin-Baker
26th June 1962
USN
F-8A Crusader  143705 VC-4. Ejection in US Lt. G. E. Custer ejected   Martin-Baker

27th June 1962

Vought F8U-2NE Crusader

149162
NJ

VF-124

x

x

x

x

1st July 1962
USN
Crusader F-8D  149188 VF-33,
CVAN-65
USS Enterprise
Catapult failure LT Edward Frances  "Sully" Sullivan
ejected
Body not recovered

[see below]

photo via Gregory Sullivan
Martin-Baker
 

My uncle Edward Frances Sullivan, aka "Sully, was flying Crusaders with VF-33 in 1962. He was a 25 year-old lieutenant when he was killed on July 1, 1962. He was from Cambridge, Mass. He was assigned to VF-33 aboard the USS Enterprise and flew the F8U-2NE (F8E). His qualifications were initially performed aboard the USS Intrepid. A low-speed cat launch (due to a catapult failure) forced him to eject at low altitude and at an unfavorable aircraft attitude. The aircraft was lost. He was seen in the water swimming as the Enterprise eased by, but he was never recovered. Not until 1994, that is, when his remains were found - not far from the accident site - in bottom-dragging nets by local fisherman. I appreciate any assistance you could offer in getting his name out; I would be thrilled to contact an old squadron-mate or two. I never knew Uncle Edward, but I grew up admiring his photographs! in newspaper clippings and the bits & pieces my mother would tell me about him. He was something of a myth to me until he re-appeared in 1994. He was found, in terms of the Gulf of Maine, a stone's throw from where he went down. It had been 32 years. His remains consisted of his orange MkV exposure suit, his red life-vest, his olive-drab g-suit and socks. He had scrawled "SULLIVAN" in marker along the front of the g-suit. I have autopsy photos; the condition of the lettering, fabrics and colors is like new. His vertebrae, pelvic bone, leg bones and foot bones were all retained within the suit. Of course, it took some time for investigators to figure out who all this belonged to, but they put it together well. Even more amazing, Uncle Edward's helmet, white with yellow lightning  bolts, yellow stars, "VF-33," and "SULLY" adorning it, was recovered about one year earlier in the same area by another fisherman. The origin of the helmet was not then determined, but it was held in high esteem by the finder. Gladly, he reunited it with Edward's remains and Edward's family was honored to finally bury him at Arlington National Cemetery, complete with caisson and honor guard. It was quite an event. A memorial stone had always existed for Uncle Edward there, and it is under that stone that he now rests. My mother always said Edward knew he would die flying fighters. It was the way a number of friends had gone before him; he, too, was resigned to a death at sea. It was a burial at sea that he got for 32 years. Now, he has it bothways. He is survived by his wife, Polly, who never remarried, and four sisters. I have always wanted to learn a much as possible about Uncle Edward, and what life for him flying F-8's was like. I hear the aircraft is thought well of by those who flew it. I know that life was everything to him. I have an Air Medal Award citation he received in 1957 (as a backseating Aviation Naval Cadet when his instructor died up front at the stick at 44,000 feet in a T-2 - that is another story!), some newspaper clippings, an accident report. But these things are a bit antiseptic. I have been aboard the Intrepid and will make for a visit aboard the Enterprise shortly. But mostly, it would be his squadron-mates memories I would relish. Thanks again for forwarding this to whomever you can. You are welcome to distribute my number and e-mail address as you see fit. Sincerely, Gregory

 202 528-2219

 

1st July 1962


USN

Vought F8U-2N Crusader

147052
NU

VF-124
USS Ranger

Off California, USA

 

x

x

 
July 1, 1962 Off California An F8U Crusader aircraft crashed into the USS RANGER, injuring two.

2nd July 1962


USN

Vought F8U-2N Crusader

147053
NH

VF-111

x

x

x

x

4th July 1962
USN
Crusader F-8C  146967
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
in US Lt. jg R. N. Super ejected   Martin-Baker
6th July 1962
also seen as 7th

USN
RF-8A Crusader  145644 VFP-62  in US ENSIGN G. M. Burton ejected   Martin-Baker
10th July 1962
USN
F-8C Crusader  146946 VMF-174  in US LTJG Robert "Bob" C. Smith ejected
killed on impact
  Martin-Baker

11th July 1962


USMC 

Vought F8U-2 Crusader

146964
WU

VMF-334

El Toro

1/Lt. M. M. Bomis ejected

x

Martin-Baker

11th July 1962
USMC 
F8U-1E Crusader  145522
WT
VMF-232 Cubi Point in Philippine Islands 1/Lt. N. R. Driscoll ejected   Martin-Baker
14th August 1962
USN
Crusader F-8C  146934 VF-84, CVA-62 USS Independence   Lt. (jg) H. E. Shephard ejected   Martin-Baker
25th August 1962
USN
Crusader F-8B  145517 VF-62
Cecil Field
Took off from
Cecil Field, near Jacksonville, heading for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

Flamed out
Crashed Leeward Point in US
Cdr. John G. Brozo
[also seen as Bronzo]
[Skipper - 'Diamond Flight']
ejected
Was found two days after the accident by an
Air Force rescue crew, flying an amphibious aircraft. They landed in
very rough seas and retrieved CDR Brozo from his one-man life raft. He
had suffered a broken back due to the ejection
  Martin-Baker
25th August 1962
USN
Crusader F-8B ???? VF-62
Cecil Field
Took off from
Cecil Field, near Jacksonville, heading for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

Flamed out
Crashed in US
LTJG Tom Malloy
['Diamond Two']
believed to have ejected
never found
  Martin-Baker
 

THUNDERSTORM FLIGHT
 
It was a beautiful Florida Saturday morning, in August 1962, when a
flight of seven F-8 Crusaders from Fighter Squadron 62 . I
well remember LTJG Tom Malloy laughing and pointing to his new flight
suit as we briefed for the long flight that morning. He had been
issued the flight suit the day before and had not tried it on. It was
about three sizes too big and he looked lost in that tent size
costume. There was no way to exchange it for another one since it was
Saturday and the supply office was closed. Tom had a wonderful sense
of humor and accepted our kidding with a big smile. That is the way I
remember him until this day.
 
As you will recall this time and date was just prior to the ‘Cuban
Missile Crisis’. Our mission was to demonstrate a ‘show of force’ at
the small Naval Base on the southeastern side of Cuba. I had joined
VF-62 just a few weeks earlier and this was my first major deployment
with the squadron. I was a ‘Nugget’ as they call the new pilots fresh
out of flight school. Two Divisions, eight airplanes, were scheduled
to deploy that morning but one of the airplanes had mechanical
problems. LCDR Paul Gillcrist was scheduled to be the second Division
leader but he never got airborne due to a radio problem as I recall.
Therefore, we had a flight of 4 and a flight of
3 F-8’s heading for Cuba.
 
We went "Feet Wet" (over water) just north of Miami. About 150 miles
southeast from Miami, over the Caribbean, we entered an area of very
low visibility at our cruising altitude of 39,000 feet. Our forward
visibility was one mile or less. We had no weather radar. In fact the
radar on board the F-8B had a maximum range of 16 miles and most of
them never worked. The weather briefing we received before the flight
made no mention of severe weather along our route of flight. We were
unaware that huge thunderstorms were hidden in the haze ahead.
Nevertheless these cumulonimbus demons were in our flight path and
were about to inflect major damage to our flight.
 
The Skipper, John Brozo (Diamond Flight) was leading the first
division of 4 airplanes. His flight consisted of LTJG Tom Malloy,
Diamond two, LT Dick Oliver, Diamond three, and LTJG Ben Walker,
Diamond four. In my flight of three airplanes were LT Al Wattay,
Division leader, LT John Nichols (Pirate) right wing and myself flying
left wing position. LT Wattay positioned our flight about 5 miles aft
and two miles abeam Diamond Flight. Although the visibility was low
the ride was fairly smooth as I recall.
 
Everything was going great until I heard the Skipper say in a very
loud and frantic voice, "DIAMOND ONE FLAMED OUT!" And as my heart was
elevating up into my throat I heard his wingman LTJG Tom Malloy saying
with even more fear in his voice, "DIAMOND TWO FLAMED OUT." Before I
could suck up more oxygen I heard the Skipper say, "DIAMOND ONE
EJECTING - STAY WITH ME IF YOU CAN!" Just seconds later I heard LT
Dick Oliver say, "DIAMOND THREE FLAMING OUT." Almost instantaneously
another call came into my headset, "DIAMOND TWO EJECTING." Nothing was
heard from Diamond Four. We thought he went down as well.
 
WOW! This was my first major cross-country with the squadron and the
airplanes were falling out of the sky. I was anxiously waiting for my
engine to quit as well. We were only seconds away from their position.
I was very tense to say the least. My heartbeat was louder than the
jet engine. However our flight of three flew through the same area,
basically at the same time, without any problems. It took many months
and numerous accident investigations to determine how our flight made
it through this area without any problems. I’ll explain why later.
 
The F-8 was a great fighter as long as the engine was running.
However, an engine flameout causes instant electrical and hydraulic
power loss. In addition, at the higher altitudes, the canopy fogs over
almost immediately. We were at 39,000 feet and the pilots who lost
engine power experienced all of the above instantaneously. This makes
the great fighter not too ‘user-friendly’ to say the least. All flight
instruments go ape, the airspeed decreases rapidly and the flight
controls freeze since there is no hydraulic power. In a situation like
this the pilot is just along for the ride, but he is frantically
trying to regain control of that hunk of metal falling through space
by instant recall of his emergency procedures. All the while he is
being slammed around in the cockpit like a sock in a washing machine.
The Navy had a term called ‘Over Learning.’ All pilots had to go over
and over emergency procedures time and time again until they could
respond automatically, in any situation, without thinking. This rote
memory of learning saved a lot of pilots and planes.
 
One of the undesirable characteristics of the F-8 is that when the
indicated airspeed reduces below 170 KIAS it will automatically enter
into a spin with just a little aileron or spoiler input. Due to the
conditions of this flight, listed above, these flamed- out Crusaders
automatically entered into a spin. It was very tough to recover the
F-8 from a spin in day VFR conditions. Add a big bad thunderstorm to
the equation, with the engine flamed out, the flight controls frozen,
the airplane spinning, and the canopy iced over makes recovery nothing
short of a miracle.
 
The F-8 was equipped with an emergency air driven generator that also
provided emergency hydraulics for primary flight controls. This Ram
Air Turbine (RAT), when extended into the air stream, was designed to
recover part of the electrical power and part of the hydraulic power
as well. The emergency generator switch had to be turned on after
dropping the RAT, or no electrical power would be supplied to the
aircraft. This procedure was easy to omit. The RAT restored hydraulic
power necessary for spin recovery and electrical power for a re-light
of the engine in this big bad cumulonimbus cloud.
 
It takes a few seconds for the RAT to come up to speed after
deployment. Sometimes, like in this case, those few seconds can feel
like an eternity. As I recall LT Oliver said in the accident report,
"The airplane was spinning before the RAT became effective." This is
kind of like the parachute riggers jokingly saying, "If it don’t work
bring it back and we will give you another one!"
 
Yet, with all this adversity Diamond Three, LT Dick Oliver, did
recover from the spin, and got his engine running again. This was by
no means an easy task. He first had to extend the RAT to regain flight
control and then he had to recover from the spin. A spinning F-8 may
go from 10 degrees nose up to 190 degrees nose down, while pulling
from plus 4 to minus 3 G’s, all the while rotating rapidly like a west
Texas twister. This short paragraph does not do justice for the superb
airmanship that Lt Oliver demonstrated that dreadful day.
 
Spin recovery procedures in the F-8 were very different and extremely
difficult. While experiencing the violent maneuvers noted above the
pilot had to move both hands to the left console and unlock the
pneumatic switch for emergency extending the leading edge landing
droop. This extended droop changed the aerodynamics of the wing and
served to get the stalled wing producing lift again. In addition, full
aft stick, and full aileron into the rotation of the spin was
required. At the same time full opposite rudder into the spin was
essential. This condition was held until the rotation stopped and only
then could the nose be brought up to pull out of the dive. If the
airplane was in un-controlled flight at 10,000 AGL the pilot was
required to eject. After recovering from a spin the leading edge
landing droop could not be retracted in the air. This placed speed and
‘G’ restrictions on the airplane. In addition the maximum range was
reduced consequentially as well. Needless to say that spins were to be
avoided and when one developed it left you with a crippled airplane.
 
The emergency engine air start procedure was a lengthy process. A lot
of altitude was lost during the re-start procedure. During this time
you were falling out of the sky like a rock. The pilot had to insure
that the RAT had been deployed and the emergency generator switch was
ON in order to supply electrical power to the igniters, which was
required to start the jet engine. If I remember correctly you tried to
establish airspeed around 200 KIAS, plus or minus 30 KIAS. This speed
supplied enough ram air through the engine intake to windmill the
engine from 17% to 30% RPM. Once these parameters were met the
throttle and ignition could be selected. If you got fuel flow of at
least 750 Pounds Per Hour the engine should relight. If not repeat the
procedures again, if you had enough altitude. Last choice was to make
a nylon descent via the ejection system.
 
When my flight leader, LT Al Wattay, heard the radio transmissions
from Diamond flight he advanced power by selecting the afterburner,
accelerated to MACH ONE and we climbed to 50,000 feet. LT Nichols
(Pirate) and I were hanging on his wing as best we could. Little did
we know at the time that the extra speed and altitude is what saved
our flight and possibly our lives. It was brought out in the accident
report that the Skipper of Diamond flight had let his formation slow
to below Mach .70, which is very slow at that altitude. They also
determined that it was a good possibility that vertical wind shears
could cause a flame out during such conditions due to reduced air
through the intake to the engine. In addition the older models F-8’s
were not equipped with engine anti-ice. This was also a factor in the
accident. Due to the fact that LT Wattay accelerated our flight to a
much higher airspeed the wind shear had no effect on our engines. In
addition climbing to a higher altitude removed us out of the icing
area. Thanks LT Wattay for great airmanship that day.
 
We proceeded on to Guantanamo after making "MAYDAY" calls and
reporting the crash site position on guard to the search and rescue
Air Force squadron in Miami. There was no way for us to locate the
downed pilots since the weather was clogged in all the way to the
deck. And besides that we just barely had enough fuel to fly to
Guantanamo. There were no Texaco Tankers available that day.
 
After landing in Cuba we assumed that three aircraft had been lost. We
still had no word from Diamond Four. All of sudden we heard an F-8
coming into the area at the speed of heat. We were very thrilled to
see Diamond Four, Lt Ben Walker, overhead. Later he told us that he
had lost his generator in the midst of all the excitement, dropped his
RAT for electrical power, but never regained his radio. All that he
knew was that his flight had disappeared in the clag.
 
Diamond One, the Skipper, was found two days after the accident by an
Air Force rescue crew, flying an amphibious aircraft. They landed in
very rough seas and retrieved CDR Brozo from his one-man life raft. He
had suffered a broken back due to the ejection. The F-8 had an
explosive cartridge in the ejection system that hit you in the butt
with mega ‘Gs’ when ejecting. A spin produces a lot of negative ‘Gs’.
The Skipper said that he was in a negative ‘G’ flight when he ejected.
This could explain his broken back due to the extra hit in the rear by
the ejection seat. He was later relieved of his command for taking his
flight through a thunderstorm. Yet, he had no way of knowing that
severe weather was in his flight path.
 
Diamond Two, Tom Malloy, was never found. About three years later his
helmet washed ashore on one of the small islands in the Caribbean. He
was reported missing until that time. We never really knew what happen
to him after he called "Ejecting." The Skipper said that his ejection
was very rough. After landing in the water he almost drowned by his
parachute pulling him under. The wind on the surface was very strong.
Under those conditions a parachute in the water can be deadly. If Tom
was injured during ejection, as the Skipper was, his survival would
have been in jeopardy.
 
The following is what a pilot may experience when ejecting from a fast
flying airplane at high altitude. As you can imagine it is a hazardous
experience to say the least. As stated above the explosive charge in
the ejection seat can give you quite a kick in the butt. This big kick
is necessary to insure that the pilot clears the vertical tail of the
airplane during an ejection. The first sequence in an ejection is for
the canopy to separate from the airplane. If it does not separate the
pilot is shot through the canopy. If the pilot ejects at 40,000 feet
he is quick to feel the cold rushing wind hitting his body at the
speed at which he ejected; let’s say 400 KTS for example. It may be 60
degrees below zero at that altitude and with very little oxygen to
breathe. This is not too good for the boys in summer flying suits. The
pilot cannot survive in that environment very long because he would
freeze to death and or die from hypoxia (lack of oxygen). The ejection
system is designed so that a small drogue parachute, about the size of
an umbrella, extends immediately after ejecting. This small chute
prevents the pilot from tumbling during descent, but he is still
falling like a brick. The ejection seat is equipped with an emergency
oxygen bottle that will last about 10 minutes for just such high
dives. This system can be used under water as well. That is if your
mask has not been ripped from your face during the high-speed exit of
the airplane.
 
The pilot, still strapped in the ejection seat, will free-fall, in
this case 30,000 feet, before the main chute opens. He is traveling at
the ‘speed of heat’ straight down. This sequence is supposed to open
the main parachute automatically by a barometric release, which is
normally set for operating at 10,000 feet above ground level. When
that altitude is reached a bladder in the seat inflates pushing the
pilot out of the seat and then the main parachute deploys. If the
automatic system does not work then the pilot can manually push the
ejection seat aside and pull the ‘D-Ring’ for the chute to open. How
does the pilot know when he reaches 10,000 feet? He can only estimate
his altitude by visual references. In a thunderstorm that is
impossible. In a storm such as this there would be limited visibility,
which would make it impossible to estimate your altitude. In addition
the pilot is in heavy rain, or hail, severe turbulence, and possible
heavy lightning.
 
Presume that the pilot gets a good parachute opening at 10,000 feet
and floats gracefully down to the waiting ocean. He still has a lot of
emergency procedures to accomplish to insure his survival. First, and
most importantly, he must unhook from the life saving parachute, which
becomes a death trap once it hits the water. When a parachute is
filled with water it will sink like a rock taking the pilot down as
well. If the pilot’s hands or arms are injured it may be impossible to
release the parachute. This quickly turns into a very serious
condition. In addition, once the parachute is released from the
pilot’s harness shroud lines from the chute may entangle the pilot.
These lines may snare him and take him under. For that reason all Navy
pilots carried an open knife, with a hook blade, attached to their
harness to cut the shroud lines if necessary.
 
If all of the above was accomplished without incident, the pilot still
had a lot of work to do. He must inflate his life vest to keep him
afloat since he is burdened with about 50 pounds of flight gear. At
this time he needs to deploy and inflate his one-man life raft that is
stored in a packet, which is attached to his harness. In this parcel
are such items as shark chaser, dye marker, signal mirror, fishing
hooks, a small salt-water distillery to convert seawater to fresh
drinking water, and a host of other small things.
 
Boarding the one-man life raft is no easy task in a swimming pool and
it becomes even more difficult in rough seas or if he is injured. Once
on board the little rubber raft a big wave can dump you back in the
water very quickly and totally mess up your command at sea. You must
re-board the little ‘private yacht’ or the sharks may eat you for
dessert. This could go on for days. These are the conditions that
Diamond One and Diamond Two were faced with that dreadful day.
 
The news media in our city broadcasted that all planes in our flight
were lost at sea. Of course that placed undue and unnecessary stress
on our families and friends. Communications back then were very
antiquated. It took hours for the facts, as we knew them, to get back
to our home base.
 
Thereafter this story was told many times in pilot training. The
point was made loud and clear to never fly into a thunderstorm.
 
I record this account in tribute to my fallen comrades. CDR John
(Diamond) Brozo, deceased; LT Dick (Smooooth One) Oliver, deceased
killed with the Blue Angels; LTJG Tom Malloy, killed on this flight;
LT Ben (Bugger) Walker (deceased); LT John (Pirate) Nichols, deceased.
As far as I know LT Al Wattay is still living. Note: The rank
indicated is the rank these officers held at the time of this
accident.
 
In this narrative I was amazed at how many emergency procedures I
could recall after 40 years. This information is 100% from my memory
and not from documents or other sources. This again proves the point
that the military drilled unto all pilots the ‘Over Learning’ process.
Most pilots could do the same. God bless.
 

Ron Knott 5/2005
 

sourcehttp://www.airtalk.org/image-vp229594.html

14th September 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8D  148685
VMF[AW]-235
"Death Angels"
NAS Dallas
Dallas, US 1/LT A. Phil Longdon Jr
ejected when attitude was inverted
killed
Martin-Baker
 

"Phil was number 2 in a 4-plane echelon entering the break at NAS Dallas. The leader broke for landing and just before Phil broke, an Air Guard F-86 that was shooting touch and goes, pulled up through the entry altitude and collided with Phil. The F8  was struck at the wing root and the wing separated from the fuselage. The F8 continued sans wing and rolled. Phil ejected, but when the seat actually fired he was inverted and was ejected into the ground at the edge of the lake. The Air Guard pilot was killed when his cockpit struck Phil's plane."

Tom O'Rorke
in email 25th November 2008

Thursday 20th September 1962
USN
Vought F-8U Crusader 143778 Utility Squadron 4
NAS Oceana
Collision at low level over Princess Anne County during "Section Tocan" radio controlled  approach LT Guy Kermit Webb
30
ejected
  Martin-Baker Mk.5
Thursday 20th September 1962
USN
Vought F-8U Crusader ?? Utility Squadron 4
NAS Oceana
Collision at low level over Princess Anne County LTJG William Henry Bader
25
killed
  Martin-Baker Mk.5

10th October 1962


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

145406
NM-106

VF-191
CVA-31 USS Bonhomme Richard

Barricade stop - but went over the side

Ltjg Don Jordan
egressed safely

x

x

 

On Oct. 10th, 1962, on board the Bonnie Dick, CVA-31, a pitching deck off the coast of Hong Kong caused the left main wheel to separate & a
bolter followed.  All other A/C were recovered & the barricade erected. 2nd pass was an OK 2 wire with the hook releasing the wire after about
30' of travel.  Barricade cable did not release from the top of the stanchions allowing the A/C to "eat" it's way thru.  The A/C left the angle deck with full power at about 100 kts. & hit the water flat.  It broke into several pieces, wing, fuselage & cockpit.  Canopy was gone so pilot proceeded to unbuckle the shoulder fittings.  Cockpit then rolled inverted & sank.  One Hartman fitting had broken, so mask had to be held in order to get oxygen. The two waist buckles were released, only to discover the left foot jammed under the rudder petal.  Pilot stood on the seat & lunged, releasing foot, & also disconnecting O2 hose at a depth of about 40'.  Swimming to the surface he saw parts of the A/C sinking around him.  The bridge had incorrectly called for full right rudder, throwing the stern toward the crash site, so the pilot also saw one of the huge props throwing bubbles as it churned past. Made it the surface after remembering to actuate the Mae West.  Chopper was right there & deposited pilot on the flight deck.  Slight injuries, cut on chin & elbow, flew two days later.

CVA-31 Capt. Bullard  VF-191
Skipper Merl Gorder, XO Jack Snyder, Safety
Officer John Harker CAG LSO Ken Wiley  VF-191 LSO Wayne Williams
Pilot
Ltjg Don Jordan  A/C F-8A  Don't have access to my log book in storage
so can't confirm BuNo.

15th October 1962
USMC
Crusader F-8C  145591 VMF-333  Ramey AFB, in Puerto Rico 2/LT J. D. Carroll ejected   Martin-Baker
16th October 1962
USN
Crusader RF8U  145604 DET65 VFP-62
CVAN65 Enterprise
Cecil in US Lt Cmdr W. Newby Kelt
[1st ejection from an F-8
see also
16th April 1963]
Martin-Baker
17th October 1962
USN
Crusader F-8C  145586
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Wilmington N.C.in US Lt. J. F. Ruchala
ejected
  Martin-Baker
17th October 1962
USN
Crusader F-8D  149156
VF-11
'Red Rippers'
CVA-42
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt
Med-Cruise
 Possible oil pressure failure
Lt. (jg) Charlie K. Dosch ejected Martin-Baker

25th October 1962


USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

146837

VTF-64 Det C
USS Kitty Hawk

Lost during mission

x

x

x

7th November 1962
photo via Harvey Hop Jr.

USN
Crusader RF-8A  146829 VFP-62 Norva in US Lt. J. McDonnell ejected   Martin-Baker
15th November 1962
USN
Crusader F-8A  143728 VF-124 Miramar in US Lt. Cdr. J. F. Sullivan
ejected
  Martin-Baker

Sunday 25th November 1962


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

149178
AF

VF-33
Starfighters
USS Enterprise
CVAN-65

Lost during mission at time of Cuban Missile Crisis. Crashed into the sea during operational CAP flight to intercept unknown aircraft

Pilot
killed

x

x

                 
  On 5th November two RF-8A Crusaders from VFP-62 flying an "Operation Blue Moon" low level reconnaissance flight were attacked by two Cuban MiG-21F Fishbeds eight miles west of Santa Clara, Cuba. The unarmed photo Crusaders were able to escape the MiGs
 
  1961 Det 33 Intrepid pilots
L-R LT Jesse Heald,
LT Jim Curry, LT Jerry
McDonald, LCDR Frank
Liberato, OinC
Photo Capt. Adam Miklovis

Det 33 USS Intrepid Nov '61
VFP-62 CO, CDR George
Winslow, VFP-62 Photo
Officer, CDR Bob Koch,OinC
LCDR Frank Liberato, LT
Jim Curry, LT Jerry McDonald,
LT Jesse Heald, LTJG Adam
Miklovis - photo Miklovis

4th December 1962
USMC 
Crusader F-8C  146914 VMF-334 Yuma in US Lt. Col. Walter Panchison ejected   Martin-Baker

26th December 1962


USMC 

Vought F-8C  Crusader

146940
DN

VMF-333
NAS Roosevelt Roads, PR, USA

Lost during mission

x

x

x

11th December 1962
USN
Crusader F-8D  149144
VF-11
'Red Rippers'
CVA-42
USS Franklin D. Roosevelt
Med-Cruise
 Probable oil pressure failure
Lt. Cdr. F. G. Fellowes Jr. ejected   Martin-Baker
 

Reportedly the cause for this ejection was an oil pressure failure. Always after that whenever Lt. Cdr Fellowes flew He insisted on an oil level check immediately before getting into the cockpit. Although it was impossible to accurately check the oil level after the engine had been shut down for more than half hour he insisted on the check anyway.

 

On your F8 ejection page I can supply some facts. I was in VF11 in 1961 & 1962 when three of the ejections occurred. I was not an eyewitness but I knew the pilots involved.

Here is some information on two of the ejections.

First ejection: Lt(jg) C.K Dosch's ejection on 17 October 1962. In your list there was another ejection on the same date. Lt(jg) Dosch is the one listed As VF11 on board CVA-42. We were on the 1962-1963 Med. Cruise. A picture of Lt(jg) Dosch can be found in the attachment or this link VF11 Officers. I don't recall the reason for this ejection.

Second ejection: Lt.Cdr F.G Fellowes' ejection on 11 December 1962. The information from the first ejection applies here also. Reportedly the cause for this ejection was an oil pressure failure. Always after that whenever Lt. Cdr Fellowes flew He insisted on an oil level check immediately before getting into the cockpit. Although it was impossible to accurately check the oil level after the engine had been shut down for more than half hour he insisted on the check anyway.

I like your website. I have been writing my life story for my grandson and was able to confirm from your website that these incidents happened as I remembered them.

Thanks for the hard work and research that went into this.

William A. Whisenant, Jr.

5th January 1963
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145434 VMF-312 Dallas in US 1.Lt. W.D.Bethea ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.F5
24th January 1963
USMC
Crusader F-8B  145480
 DW
VMF-251 Beaufort in US Major Kenny C. Palmer
ejected
  Martin-Baker Mk.5A

24th January 1963


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

141355
UH

VU-7

x

x

x

x

25th January 1963
USN
Crusader F-8D  147066 VF-124
CVA-19
USS Hancock
  LT W. S. Fields III ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.F5

1st February 1963


USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

146851

VFP-63
USS Kitty Hawk

Lost during mission

x

x

x

5th February 1963


USN

Vought F-8C Crusader

145551
AJ-2??

VF-103

x

x

x

x

15th February 1963
USN
Crusader RF-8A  145640
PP-928
VFP-63
"Eyes of the Fleet"
USS Coral Sea
CVA-43
Rolled over to the left when it became airborne. after launching and he ejected with the aircraft inverted into the sea LT Delmar Dirk Young ejected
killed.
His body was not recovered
  Martin-Baker Mk.F5
   

18th February 1963


USN

Vought F-8C Crusader

146928
NG-1??

VF-91

x

x

x

x

25th February 1963


USN

Vought DF-8A Crusader

143711
UA

VC-1

x

x

x

x

10th March 1963


USMC

Vought F-8C Crusader

147032

VMF-333

x

x

x

x

11th March 1963


USMC

Vought RF-8A Crusader

144621
TN

VMCJ-3

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

19th March 1963
USN
Vought F-8D Crusader

147920
AC-2??

VF-32
"Swordsmen"
CV-60
USS Saratoga

Crashed on the flight deck during night time air operation.

CDR Ed J. Clayton
[VF-32 Skipper]
killed

 
These details need confirming
25th March 1963
USMC
Capt. Donald E. Cathcart
ejected
at low level

photo via: Don Cathcart
Martin-Baker Mk.5A
F-8D Crusader  148655 VMF-451
MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina
USA
Flame out on final approach
 
I just looked at your web of F8U crashes and losses. On 25 March 1963 Capt. Donald E. Cathcart ejected from a VMF 451 F8 on final approach due to flame out. He was low and slow but suffered no injuries. I had packed that parachute.
 

DETAILS OF THE FOLLOWING TWO LOSSES NEEDED

1961 or 1962
date needed

USMC
F-8 Crusader   VMF 235
MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina
USA
Flamed out on final approach Captain
USAF exchange pilot
ejected
  Martin-Baker
1961 or 1962
date needed

USMC
F-8 Crusader   VMF 122
MCAS Beaufort, South Carolina
USA
Flamed out on final approach, successfully kept plane from hitting base housing Captain Eddings [?]
killed
no ejection
  Martin-Baker
 

 

26th March 1963
USN
RF-8A Crusader  146862 VFP-62 Mayport in US LT W. L. Taylor ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5A

27th March 1963


USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

146877

VFP-63
Det. D

x

x

x

x

8th April 1963
USN
Vought F8 Crusader 144612

VFP-62
USS Saratoga

Aircraft went into the water while attempting to photograph a Russian trawler

LTJG John Richard Richardson
killed

x

16th April 1963
USN
RF8U Crusader 146894 VFP-62,
USS Enterprise
CVAN-65
 
  LCDR W. Newby Kelt
[2nd ejection from an F-8
see also
16th October 1962]
Martin-Baker Mk.5A
14th May 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader 145563 VF-194
USS Ranger
CVA-61
 
  LTJG R. G. Bengston
ejected

Is this the same pilot who ejected
27th February 1962
&
21st September 1964

  Martin-Baker
16th May 1963
USN
F-8B Crusader 145537 VF-62
USS Shangri La
CVA-38
 
  LTJG B. N. Walker
ejected
  Martin-Baker

Tuesday 21st May 1963


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

145391
UH


VU-7
 NAS North Island

Yuma

LTJG John S. Emerson
ejected

x

Martin-Baker

FEEDBACK

John S Emerson here, a little more data on May 21, 1963 ejection.  I was on a detachment from Utility Squadron 7 out of NAS North Island towing a DekMar target for VMF 334 staging out of MCAS Yuma.  The shooter flew by the target, locked on to me, got a clear to fire and the sidewinder worked perfectly.  Down I went.  With the nose pointed straight down, engine frozen from missile debris and the speed meter rapidly approaching Mach 1, I jumped out.  Rough ride, the seat worked but not as smoothly as advertised but good enough.

John
in email 15th April 2011

11th June 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader 146930 VF-124 Miramar in US LtJG Frank H. Harrington

[1st F-8 ejection see also 24th February 1967]
was he involved in any mishap 11th November 1965 ??

Martin-Baker
13th June 1963
USN
RF-8A Crusader 146832 VFP-63 in US LT Lawrence King "L. K." Dalrymple
ejected
see also 30th November 1961
missing
body never recovered
grave marker in the Memorial Section D area of Arlington National Cemetery
CHECK Martin-Baker
 

Sincere thanks to LT. Dalrymple's niece Laura for information on her uncle
in email 11th March 2013

Friday 14th June 1963 USN Vought RF-8A Crusader 146880
PP
VFP-63 Det I.
USS Hancock
Fantail crash southwest of Honolulu Lt. Donald John Meyer
28
Santee, California
  Martin-Baker
15th June 1963
USN
F-8E Crusader 149183 VF-124  Cecil in US Lt. D. R. Morris
ejected
  Martin-Baker
18th June 1963
USMC
 F‑8E Crusader 149200
WS
VMA(AW)‑323
El Toro
Fuel cell overfilled during refueling and caught fire. Crashed into Pacific Major Donald K. Tooker
ejected through a sheet of flames. safely moments before the
aircraft exploded.
Picked up from the water by Navy Destroyer USS Koiner (DE-331) later
Martin-Baker
 

"   .   .   .  The rescue of Maj Donald K. Tooker on 18 June 1963 was a "one in a million chance" in the shark-infested waters. The seas were so rough with 12-foot swells that the ship's other whale boat had sank earlier in the day during a practice man-overboard drill."

19th June 1963

USMC
F‑8E Crusader 150298
WS
VMA(AW)‑323 Fuel cell overfilled during refueling and caught fire. Crashed into Pacific 1Lt. Cliff Judkins, III was unable to eject due to a seat failure, so he was forced to bail out at 220 knots, . His parachute, however, failed to open, and Judkins fell 10,000 feet into the ocean. Incredibly, he survived, with moderate injuries to his face,
pelvis, and ankles.
He was picked up in a little over 2 hours.

photo via Cliff Judkins
Martin-Baker
20th June 1963
USN
F-8A Crusader 143692
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil in US
ENS J. P. Robillard
ejected
  Martin-Baker
ENS J. P. Robillard was part of the original French Pilot group to train with VF 174 and then returned to France to later become an Admiral

18th July 1963


USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

145640

VFP-63

Crashed following launch into Yellow Sea off South Korea

Pilot killed

x

x

24th July 1963
USN
Vought F-8A Crusader 143818
NP

VF-211
FITRON 211
"Fighting Checkmates"
Plane inverted on take off. Crashed at Cubi Point, Philippine Islands Lt. Hal Crandall
killed
  Martin-Baker
30th July 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader 146977
NJ
VF-124
Miramar
Crashed west of Superstition Mountain, Burrego, CA in US Lt. Cdr. D. L. Whitman ejected   Martin-Baker

31st July 1963


USN

Vought F-8B Crusader

145435
AD


VF-174
"Hellrazors"

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

2nd August 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader  145597 VF-103
Oceana
in US Lt. G. F. Talken ejected   Martin-Baker
5th August 1963
11:00

USN
F-8E Crusader  150312 VF-174
Ocala
Cecil Field, Jacksonville
 Birdstrike at low level. Bird went thru the canopy. Crashed near Dunnellon in US Lt. Theodore R. "Ted" Swartz
ejected at low level (500ft) landing in a cemetery.
  Martin-Baker

FEEDBACK

I found your page on F-8 Crusader ejections last night, and found it very interesting reading.

Attached is some additional information I found on Lt. Swartz's ejection from BuNo 150312 on 5 August 1963. The article is from the St. Petersburg (Florida) Times of 6 August 1963.

(There's also a somewhat famous recording of a radio broadcaster trying to read this story several times over, but unable to stop laughing at the idea of the airplane hitting a buzzard.)

Jodie Peeler
in email 21st April 2013

26th August 1963
USN
F-8A Crusader  143729 VC-10 Leeward Point in US Lt. JG D. H. Beyer ejected   Martin-Baker

13th August 1963


USMC

Vought F-8B Crusader

145516
WI

VMF-232

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

26th August 1963


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

143729
JH

VU-10

x

x

x

x

28th August 1963
USN
RF-8A  Crusader  144610 VFP-62
Jax
Lost in a operational accident  in US Lt. JG T. V. Hallcom  ejected

 

 
Martin-Baker
3rd September 1963
[also seen as 1nd September]

USMC
Vought F-8D Crusader 147061
DB
VMF(AW)-235
NAS Atsugi.
 Kanagawa Prefecture
Martin-Baker
Crashed beside or near prefectural road, north of NAF Atsugi Capt. Michael J. Hanley
ejected at low level
pelvis injured
[personal testimony]
 
  photo courtesy Tom O'Rorke

16th September 1963


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150342
NJ

VF-124

x

x

x

x

18th September 1963


USN

Vought F-8C Crusader

147020
NE

VF-24
Red Checkertails

Damaged beyond repair

x

x

x

20th September 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader 147008 VF-194 Yuma in US Lt. Kiper ejected   Martin-Baker
9th October 1963
USN
F-8D Crusader 148674 VF-32,CVA-60
USS Saratoga
  Lt. Cdr. A. D. Williams ejected   Martin-Baker
10th October 1963
USN
F-8E Crusader 150338 VF-62, CVA-38
USS Shangri La
  Lt. Cdr. H. L. Terry ejected   Martin-Baker

14th October 1963


USN

Vought F-8D Crusader

147907
AC-2??

VF-32
USS Saratoga

Lost during mission

x

x

x

17th October 1963
USN
F-8A Crusader 143787 VF-162, CVA-34
USS Oriskany
  Lt. JG J. P. Humbert ejected   Martin-Baker

17th October 1963


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

143797
AH

VF-164

x

x

x

x

22nd October 1963
USN
RF-8A Crusader 144621 NARF NO ISL North Island in US Lt. J. J. Adams ejected   Martin-Baker
29th October 1963
USN
RF-8A Crusader 144622 VFP-63, [C?]VA-14
USS Ticonderoga
  Lt. D. B. Fickenscher ejected   Martin-Baker
6th November 1963
USN
F-8D Crusader 148676 VF-154, CVA-43
USS Coral Sea
  Lt. K. J. J. Jackson ejected   Martin-Baker
7th November 1963
USN
F-8C Crusader 145547 VF-124 Miramar in US ENS J. R. Andrews ejected   Martin-Baker
13th November 1963
USN
RF-8A Crusader
This photo is from a series taken by LT Rod Rogers. The full set can be found on his web site [LINK] and is used with his permission
Lt. JG Julian M. Baucom ejected safely Martin-Baker
14683
AJ 902
VFP‑62
Fighting Photos

Oceana
in US  off the US east coast.
26th November 1963
USMC
F-8B Crusader 145461 VMF-251 Roos Roads in US 1.Lt. W. A. James  ejected   Martin-Baker

4th December 1963


USN

Vought F-8B Crusader

145430
AD


VF-174
"Hellrazors"

x

x

x

x

13th December 1963
USN
Crusader F-8C
NJ
 145577 VF-124
Miramar
 in US.over the desert, CA Lt (jg) Eugene J. Chancy
ejected
[see also 2nd May 1966]

 

 
Martin-Baker
FEEDBACK

Enjoyed reading about the F-8's. Didn't an F-8 lose it's wings sometime maybe in the mid to late 60's at NAS Cecil Field and the pilot stayed with the a/c to keep it from crashing into houses?

About 1963 an F-8 made a wheels up landing at Cecil Field. I was in the F-8 rag outfit and when they decided to tow that a/c to NAS Jacksonville for repairs, I rode standing up on the wing with a long wood pole to move traffic lights. People never believe me when I tell them I rode standing up on the wings of an F-8 from NAS Cecil Field to NAS Jacksonville.

Jerry Usery AE1
USN Retired
in email 17th March 2013

Does anyone remember seeing Jerry on his journey?
Please write with your memories

Thursday 16th January 1964


USMC

Vought F8U Crusader

148702


VMF(AW)-235
"Death Angels"
Atsugi Air Base, Japan

Engine failure on take off at 200 feet and steered the F8 clear of the town. Crashed at Zama Town, Kanagawa Prefecture, Civilian property damaged

Charles "Frog" Allison
attempted ejection
believed seat failed
Killed

 

FEEDBACK

Chas. “Frog” Allison was a ‘Sader jock with VMF(AW)235 at Atsugi, Japan.
Semper Fly!
COL Will Thornton
additional information in email 31st March 2011 & photo below 23rd February 2012

 
Quartet from VMF(AW)-235 "Death Angels"
(L-R )
Charles "Frog" Allison
[fatal accident
Thursday 16th January 1964]
     

Wednesday 22nd January 1964

 

Vought F-8D Crusader

148667
VM

VMF(AW)-451

x

x

x

x

Wednesday 19th February 1964
USN
F-8 Crusader  146869 VFP-62 Det 60
Fighting Photos
USS Saratoga
CVA-60
  LtCdr. John M. McCall
ejected, inverted, at low level
[
about 200'-300' AGL]
and was killed.
He was not recovered
Martin-Baker
Mk.5
 

"Mac" was O-IN-C of VFP-62/Det 60...out of Cecil, I believe.  I was witness to his death, off the Saratoga (CVA-60), out of Mayport, in the Med...standing on the fantail of Sara, watching a practice run of an upcoming "Fire Power" demo, or some such other nonsense.  Mac was to perform a "Photo Loop"...came steaming down the port side of the boat, bow to stern, began the loop, and flew almost immediately into a solid overcast at about 1500'...at about the time he should be recovering from the maneuver, his Crusader appeared, rapidly descending in an inverted flat spin, just aft of the fantail, almost above my position...I recognized the situation, and while most (non aviator types) were ooohing and aaawwing, I was "beating feet" for the security of the island...was almost there when I heard the boom of his seat fire.  I was with our (VA-35's) Maintenance Officer, an LDO, Lt. Gus Elison.  As I wandered back to Gus' position, he explained Mac punched out at about 200'-300' AGL...while inverted.  Not a chance...

 

Gus and I still very close...he in JAX, me in the Florida Keys...he was telling me less than a year ago about a memorial to Mac in his church in JAX, which Mac also attended...guess they were quite friendly...if you'd like to contact him, here you go:

 

LCdr Gus Elison USN Ret 

8206 Caravelle Dr 

Jacksonville  FL  32244

 

(940) 612-2164

 

guselison@aol.com

 

25th February 1964
USMC
F-8B Crusader  145501 VMF-232 Kaneohe in Hawaii 2nd Lt. D. L. Dummond ejected   Martin-Baker
4th March 1964
USMC
RF-8A Crusader 146847
TN
VMCJ-3
El Toro
12 miles southwest of San Clemente Island Lt. J. T. Gunn ejected safeIy and landed in the water   Martin-Baker

6th March 1964


USN

Vought F-8A Crusader

143688
UA

VC-1

x

x

x

x

10th March 1964


USMC

Vought F-8B Crusader

145426
WD

VMF-312

x

x

x

x

14th March 1964


USMC

Vought F-8C Crusader

146950
WU

VMF-334
El Toro MCAS, California

Hand stopped over at Barksdale. Canopy was fired but aircraft impacted ground  on the J.A. Morgan plantation 15 miles north of Minden before ejection

2nd LT Lester Mack Kennedy Jr.
ejected
killed

x

x

FEEDBACK

Crashed in Louisiana (Barksdale AFB) during thunderstorm while on a cross-country to Beaufort, SC..  2nd Lt. Lester Mack Kennedy was killed and is buried at Arlington.  He was my roommate at Pensacola (MARCAD); I was Navy AOC.  Made contact with both his daughter and son, who did not ever meet him..........not born yet......4 months after killed..................in 2006, and was able to give them,  letters to me from him, as well a pictures................oddly enough, daughter was born in California, raised in Texas, and was working in Minneapolis (my hometown) when I returned for a visit from my present home in Thailand. Hope this helps.

Best Regards,
Don Ward
in email 13th March 2013

15th March 1964

 

Vought F-8 A Crusader

144438

Is this the loss shown below ????

15th March 1964
USN
DF8A
RF-8A Crusader
 144439
UA
VC-1 Crashed shortly after takeoff at  NAS Barbers Point , Hawaii Lt. Cdr. Jim L. Berry ejected   Martin-Baker

FEEDBACK


"While looking through the contents of F8 Crusader ejections I noted that there was a question on the designation of some the early model types.   The March 15, 1964 Buno 144439 ejection was a DF8A vice RF8A , pilot was LCDR Jim Berry, deceased, shortly after takeoff at  NAS Barbers Point , Hawaii.  The DF8A was used for controlling the submarine launched Regulus cruise missile.
I remember this as I had flown the A/C two days previously and had a complete loss of control during wing transition due to malfunction of the roll and yaw stabilization prior to landing.  The A/C rolled inverted at 1500 feet!!  I immediately returned the wing position handle to cruise ,  lit the burner, rolled back to level flight and recovered at about 200 feet.   The subsequent maintenance could not find any problem and returned the A/C to service.   Berry lost control as he transitioned the wing from takeoff to cruise position,  the A/C rolled inverted and he ejected over the ocean at the end of the runway.
I enjoyed looking at all the accident data you have recorded,  I think there were very few of us that flew the Crusader that did not have a reason to eject at some time during our time in the F8."    

Phil Sisney
USNR  CDR (ret)
in email 6th November 2008
 

17th March 1964


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150873
NP


VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"
NAS Miramar

Mid-air collision of La Jolla

LT Spencer J. Thomas
31
San Diego -  - ejected at 5000 ft, rescued by Coast Guard 5 miles off coast

x

Martin-Baker

17th March 1964


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150874
NP


VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"
NAS Miramar

Mid-air collision of La Jolla

LTJG Earnest M. Colvin III
26
missing

x

Martin-Baker

  "   .   .   .   A brilliant fireball in the sky that was seen by thousands along the Southland coast Tuesday night was believed to have been caused by the mid-air collision of two Navy jets off LA Jolla"
1st April 1964 USN F-8A Crusader 143725 VC-2 Oceana in US Lt(jg) A. D. Jenkins ejected   Martin-Baker
Sunday 5th April 1964
About 17:30
USMC RF-8A Crusader 146891 VMCJ-1
Golden Hawks
Returning on routine flight from Kadena AB, Okinawa Prefecture, to Atsugi AB, Kanagawa Prefecture crashed in shopping area2 Choume, Hara Machida, Machida City, 20 miles southwest of Tokyo Capt. R. L. Bown
ejected
at 5000 ft
  Martin-Baker
 

April 1964:
About 17:30, an USN F-8U crashed in shopping area, 2 Choume, Haramachida, Machida City, Toukyou.
Pilot ejected. Four civilians killed. 32 wounded.
27 houses destroyed or damaged.
Back then, Machida City population was 96,891.
Returning from Kadena AB, Okinawa Prefecture, to Atsugi AB, Kanagawa Prefecture.
killing 4 Japanese and injuring 26 others while flattening 10 homes.

11th April 1964 Chance Vought F-8 Crusader 147036   Dallas Test Pilot Mr. Robert "Bob" E. Rostine ejected   Martin-Baker
FEEDBACK Bob was stall testing the boundary layer control system and entered an inverted flat spin at about 12,000 ft.  He was about 50 miles southwest of Dallas when he finally punched out at about 5000 ft.  He suffered a broken leg but recovered OK.  After Bob ejected, the plane recovered by itself, climbed out to the NE over downtown Dallas, ran out of fuel and crashed in a corn field in east Texas near Greenville.  Speculation was that the drag from the canopy and the ejection explosion together gave the airframe the push it needed to find some air again, but by that time Bob was gone.  The flight over Dallas was caught on the cameras mounted on the vertical stabilizer and made for some really good blooper film, as did the wheels-up landing in the corn field.  It was serious "pucker time" there at the telemetry station for awhile.  We all really got lucky that day.  Bob was never allowed to forget the incident, and I never will either.

Jim Pyeatt

12th April 1964

 

Vought F-8E Crusader

150291
DB

VMF(AW)-235

x

x

x

x

Friday 17th April 1964

 

USMC
Vought F-8C Crusader

146959
DN



photos via Rogers' Family


VMF-333
"Fighting Shamrocks"
Leeward Point
   MAJOR William W. Rogers
Ejected
body not recovered
Martin-Baker or Vought
Over water 42 miles from Guantanamo naval base
 

My name is Phil Rogers. My Father was Major William W. Rogers, USMC. He went ejected from his Crusader F8C on April 17th, 1964. I was just two years old at the time. I am interested in hearing from some of the men who served with him or witnessed his last flight. According to his brothers, there were questions raised at the time about his disappearance, but when his oldest brother came back from trying to get more info he reported that the family was told not to ask anymore questions. Case closed. I have waited this long to research this only out of consideration for my mother and step-father, whom she met and married in 1966.
 bowhawk62@comcast.net 20 Jun 09

                 
23rd April 1964 USN F-8E Crusader 149160 VF-124 Miramar in US Ens. P. V. Vampatella ejected
[see book in file for biography]
Martin-Baker
21st May 1964 USMC F-8B Crusader 145506 VMF-232 Kaneohe in Hawaii 2nd Lt. Frederick C. Gardner
ejected
landed in knee deep water
  Martin-Baker
6th June 1964
USN
RF-8A Crusader 146823
PP-
probably assigned to VPF-63 or an airborne early warning squadron VAW-111/CVA-63

VFP-63, Det C, Kittyhawk

AAA Ejection in Vietnam War. This was the first combat loss of the Crusader. at Nong Pet, N of Xiangkohang, over Loas Capt Charles Frederic  Klusmann
ejected
and captured and later escaped
Martin-Baker
7th June 1964
USN
F-8D Crusader
NH-110
147064 VF-111
USS KITTY HAWK
Shot down, Ground fire 35 M S of Xiangkohang, Laos, CDR Doyle Wilmer Lynn
ejected safely, survived
rescued next day
Martin-Baker
CDR Lynn was killed on 27th May 1965 during a strike on North Vietnam
7th June 1964
also seen as 5th August

USN
F-8E Crusader 150319 VF‑191
USS Bon Homme Richard
Engine failure during a training flight in the South China Sea Lt W D Storey
Survived
[check to see if ejected]
   
Monday 8th June 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader  150314
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil Field, Jacksonville, Florida
Plane shuddered and went into an uncontrolled climb during gunnery practice flight, then went vertically down. Lt. R. H. "Mickey" Brown
ejected at 2,300 feet

Martin-Baker Mk.5
10th June 1964
USN
F-8D Crusader  148669 VF-32 Cecil in US Lt(jg) L. M. Nelson ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
19th June 1964
also seen as 25th

USN
F-8C Crusader  145581 VF-194 in US
also seen as Atsugi, Japan
Lt. B. C. Morehouse ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
22nd June 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader  150847 VF-53
CVA-14, USS Ticonderoga
  Lt(jg) D. L. Bourland ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5

26th June 1964


USN

Vought F-8B Crusader

145422
JH

VU-10

x

x

x

x

13th July 1964


USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

145621

VFP-62 Det 65
USS Enterprise

Lost during mission

x

x

x

14th July 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader  149206
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil in US Lt. Cdr. A. L. Alexander ejected   Martin-Baker
24th July 1964
USN
F-8A Crusader 145334 VC-4 Cecil in US Lt(jg) G. L. Lawrence ejected   Martin-Baker
4th August 1964
USN

Vought RF-8A Crusader

146854

VFP-63
Miramar

  LCDR Smith
ejected
  Martin-Baker
5th August 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader 150139 USS Bon Homme Richard

Lost to an operational accident

LT W. D. Storey
ejected

x

Martin-Baker

13th August 1964


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150895
AH

VF-162

x

x

x

x

13th August 1964
USMC
F-8B Crusader 145504 VF-232 in Hawaii Capt. J. M. Moriarty
ejected
  Martin-Baker Mk.5

24th August 1964


USN

Vought FE Crusader

150304

VMF(AW) 122

Lost during night operational flight from NAS Atsugi (Japan)

 Lt. J. F. Hudgins
killed

x

x

FEEDBACK
 

 "Happened onto the website tonight.  I am a former member of VMF(AW) 122,  an F8 squadron.  Saw the record of Lt. R. D. Marshall's ejection in November of '64 but didn't see a record of the loss of Lt. J. F. Hudgins and his Crusader on August 24th, 1964.

    Lt. Hudgins was on night ops out of NAS Atsugi (Japan) at the time.  At about 8:45pm in the evening he was attempting to land when he struck the Wheels Watch tower.  His plane crashed just short of the runway, killing Lt. Hudgins.  I pulled guard duty that night at the wreckage site.  Thought you might want to add this mishap to the record."

Sincerely,

Jim Gosnell
Chandler, AZ
in email 20th December 2009

information added 21st December 2009

24th August 1964
USN
F-8C Crusader 145585 VC-4
[VU-4 det A]
Cecil in US Ens. S. W. Hauck ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5

27th August 1964


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150881
NP


VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"

x

x

x

x

31st August 1964
USMC
F-8E Crusader 150285 VF-235 Key West in US Capt. D. E. Downing ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
8th September 1964
USN
F-8C Crusader 146935
NM-4
VF-194
CVA-31 USS Bonhomme Richard
Atsugi Naval Station, Japan

Engine trouble. Crashed at the Tateno Metal Factory in Kamisouyagi, Yamato City, Kanagawa Prefecture.
Ground casualties

LT R. C. Schroeder ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
NOTE

About an hour earlier an Air Force F-105 Thunderchief went into the bank of the Sagami River at Hon-Atsugi about a mile from the factory and burst into flames. the pilot was killed

12th September 1964


USMC

Vought F-8D Crusader

148627
WD

VMF(AW)-212
USS Hancock

Tail hook broke. Ran off carrier

x

x

x

17th September 1964
USN
F-8D Crusader 148641
VF-174
"Hellrazors"
Cecil LCDR L. W. Henderson ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
21st September 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader 149135 VF-162
CVA-34
USS Oriskany
  Lt(jg) R. A. Bengston
ejected

Is this the same pilot who ejected
27th February 1962
&
14th May 1963

  Martin-Baker Mk.5
24th September 1964
USN
RF-8A Crusader 143749 NATC PAX Patuxent in US LT J. J. Hernandez ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
26th September 1964
USMC
F-8E Crusader 150886 VMF-312
Luke AFB
O & R Mismatched engine bearings, in US Capt. James "Jim" T. Smith
ejected
  Martin-Baker Mk.5

26th September 1964


USMC

Vought F-8D Crusader

148696
VM

VMF(AW)-451

x

x

x

x

9th October 1964
USN
F-8D Crusader  148629 VF-32 Cecil in US Lt. R. N. Fitzgerald ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
14th October 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader  150856 VF-124 / CVA-34
USS Oriskany
  Ens. C. W. Glasscock ejected   Martin-Baker Mk.5
16th October 1964
USN
F-8E Crusader  150929 VF-62 / CVA-62
USS Independence
  Lt(jg) Larie K. Clark ejected   Martin Baker Mk5a
1st November 1964
USN
F-8E
crusader
149141
NF-
VF-53
CVW‑5
USS
Ticonderoga
CVA-14
Crashed into the sea after launch LT Tom Fallon (KIA)  
FEEDBACK

On 1 November 64 I was the CO of VF-53 aboard USS Ticonderoga and due to heavy Air ops was directed to send one of my aircraft back to NAS Cubi Pt., I sent my wingman LT Tom Fallon in F8E Buno 149141. He made a normal night cat shot in light rain and started a normal climb then slowly descended, when the Air Boss told him to pull up,he did not respond to the call by voice or control action. Visibility was so bad we did not see him hit the water. The rescue helo only found his helmet. I have attached a photo of Tom.
JC

FEEDBACK

Lt Thomas B. Fallon was my boyhood hero. He was my teacher in the eighth grade in Odenton, MD. One day he announced to the class he was going to join the Navy. We stayed in close touch by letter and phone. He told me he was assigned to VF-53 aboard the USS Ticonderoga.  They were headed to the western Pacific.  In 1964 I was looking at the August 21st issuse of Life magazine. (I still have the copy) There on page 31, walking across the Tico deck, larger than life, was my hero, Mr. Fallon. He had just returned from the attack on Vinh. He told me he was looking forward to sharing every detail of the attack at our next meeting. In late November, 1964 I received an envelope containing several of my unopened, unread letters. My heart was broken. My boyhood hero was dead. Mr. Fallon has been my hero for over forty-nine years.
Thank you,

William Turner
in email 25th October 2009

4th November 1964


USN

Vought F-8D Crusader

148704
NE


VF-211
"Fighting Checkmates"

x

x

x

x

12th November 1964
USMC
F-8E Crusader 149224 VMF-122 Cubi Point in Philippines Lt. R. D. Marshall ejected   Martin-Baker
13th November 1964
USMC
RF-8A Crusader 146879
PP-
VMCJ 1, MAG 12
Detachment F, VFP‑63
USS Constellation
Collided with A-4C (149570) of VA-146 during a during training flight  about 15 miles north of Da Nang Capt Darl Russell Bloom
(KWF)

No ejection
   
FEEDBACK

13th of November 1964. Captain Bloom tried to launch two times but had to abort due to radio failure. He was anxious to depart the carrier as he was to transfer back to the states. People at the time felt that radio failure was the reason that he collided with an A-4. The initial contact was with the underside of the A-4 with the canopy of the F-8. There was no ejection attempted. The pilot* of the A-4 ejected and was picked up and returned to the carrier.

Ray Mauk
Plane Captain, VFP-63, Det.F
in email 28th October 2009

Note *LTJG J. H. Knollmueller ejected from A-4C (149570) of VA-146
8th December 1964
USN
F-8A Crusader  145333 VC-5 Atsugi in Japan Lt(jg) W. C. C. Clark ejected   Martin-Baker
11th December 1964
USMC
RF-8A Crusader  146888 VMCJ-1 Crashed Cubi Point in the Philippines CAPT P. L. Derrig
e
jected late and was still in the seat when it hit the ground
[name difficult to read from USN file]
  Martin-Baker
 

The loss of the RF8A on 11 Dec 1964 has some errors.  The pilots name is Derig (possibly with 2 or's) and the location of the crash is .  The pilot ejected late and was still in the seat when it hit the ground. I was the plane captain for that airplane and launched him on that flight.

 

The loss on 1 June 1965, LCDR Crosby was the pilot, was actually a Marine Corps aircraft assigned to VMCJ 1.  I can not remember the nose numbers for either of the planes but both had RM designations. We normally has two aircraft on Yankee Station to assist VFP 63,  Again, I was plane captain on this flight.

 

J Smoot, Cpl USMC

VMCJ 1 1964-65

Dec 13, 1964
MANILAAP A U.S. Marine Corps pilot was killed when his F8 Crusader jet crashed on Mindoro ... Air Station It was attached to a squadron based at Iwakuni Japan.

 

22nd December 1964


USN

Vought F-8E Crusader

150345
AK-1??

VF-13

x

x

x

x

30th December 1964
USMC
F-8B Crusader  145440 VMF-232 Kaneohe in Hawaii Lt. A. R. Atkinson ejected   Martin-Baker

 

   
  Nov 27, 1964
 
An Air Force spokesman said Lieutenant Hermes had ejected himself from the plane after he had piloted it away from nearby inhabited areas.

 

 

 

I would like to thank everyone who over the years who has helped make the F-8 listings so complete including

Vought / LTV

Dick Atkins [played a major role in putting the Martin-Baker seat into the Crusader]

United States Navy
[and related]

Bill Boardman, Jim Brady, John Braly, Jack Carman, Larie Clark, Ron Coalson, Mark Daniels,  Gary Davis, Bob Dose, Bob Harrison, Don Johnson, Cliff Jones, Charles Klusmann, Pete McGuirk, Peter Mersky, Pete Michaels, Dick Nelson, Dick Newton, Cole Pierce, Jim Pyeatt, Vic Riley, Francis Rozinski, Phil Sisney, John Sledge, Barrett Tillman, Bob Wiedemann,  Ken Jack  www.vfp62.com,

United States Marine Corps
[and related]

Donald E. [Ed] Cathcart (www.mofak.com), Cliff Judkins, Marv Garrison, Michael J. Hanley, Greg Frucci (Allen's son), Tom O'Rorke http://VMF235.com, Major General Hal  Vincent, USMC Retd

      Please let me know if I have omitted your name, placed it in the wrong section, or that you want it removed.
 

Known ejections during westpac tour 1960 all from VMF-312

Jan 60  F8U1 Capt. Gene Merritt Ejected over Mt. Fugi during tactics flight

Mar 60  F8U1 Capt. M.P.Cady Ejected after hitting round down on USS Midway?

Aug 60  F8U1 Capt  W.T.O'rourke Near Iwakuni Japan.fatal no attemt to eject

Note from Vought Web Site
The Crusaders were originally equipped with an ejection seat designed by Vought. During the mid-1950�s the U.S.Navy entered into an agreement with Martin-Baker, Ltd. in England to equip all Navy carrier-based aircraft with a version of their ejection seat.  The seat as modified for the Crusader was designated as the F-5. By the time all of the modifications to the airframe were designed, it was decided that the in-station incorporation of the change would be made beginning with the F8U-2 model, and all of the F8U-1 and -1E aircraft would be modified by the Navy during their next depot-level maintenance period.   

last updated
Monday, 20 January 2014 22:18