Aircraft by type

 

McDonnell F2H Banshee

Ejections

(click here to view All Known Losses)

 

Those ejections still with white background - extra information being established
? denotes almost unreadable from archive copy - the records were handwritten.
Date Air Force A'cft Unit / Serial based crashed crew photo seat
9th August 1949
USN
McDonnell F2H-1 Banshee VF-171   on a routine training flight after picking up a new F2H Banshee at Cherry Point. Flying at 38,000 feet, near
Walterboro, South Carolina
Lt. Jack L. "Pappy" Fruin ejected at 597 m.p.h McDonnell
24th May 1950
USN
F2H Banshee   VF-171

ejected near Jacksonville had trouble with G forces before escaping

Lt. Hugh J. Tate ejected got a good chute and descended safely. He suffered only a bruise under his right eye when wind force tore the oxygen mask from his face   McDonnell
20th September 1950
USN
F2H Banshee     Structural failure, explosion. Spinning Civilian Test Pilot MacMilliam ejected
pulled face curtain 3 times
  McDonnell
24th May 1952
USN
 McDonnell Douglas F2H2 Banshee ????   Engine explosion 200 miles east of Jacksonville, USA Ensign Walter "Walt" E. Ohlrich ejected at 6,000 ft.Rescued by helicopter McDonnell
4th August 1952
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Collision with tow banner LT(jg) W. M. Stutts ejected   McDonnell
15th November 1952
USN
F2H-2P Banshee 126692 VC-61 Det G
USS Oriskany (CVA-34)
Mechanical failure Lt. D. I. Kinney ejected near K-18   McDonnell
19th April 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Vertigo, became disorientated Ensign J. D. McGee ejected DID HE SURVIVE ?? McDonnell
22nd April 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Explosion Lt(Jg) N. H. Navarre ejected Evidently landed in St. John's River [Florida] DID HE SURVIVE ?? McDonnell
18th May 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Fire Ensign W. C. Burke ejected DID HE SURVIVE ?? McDonnell
16th June 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Loss of control Lt(jg) J. H. Stephenson ejected DID HE SURVIVE ?? McDonnell
29th June 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Fire Lt(jg) L. S. Houchins ejected DID HE SURVIVE ?? McDonnell
22nd July 1953
USN
F2H-2 Banshee 123282 VF-62
USS Lake Champlain (CVA-39)
Hit by AAA, caught fire,  Lt. Harold  C. Joines ejected off the East Coast of Korea. Rescued by a helo from the USS Bremerton (CA-130)   McDonnell
31st January 1954
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Smoke Lt(jg) J. Quinn ejected   McDonnell
25th March 1954
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Loss of control 2nd Lt. H. V. Dixon ejected   McDonnell
3rd June 1954
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Smoke, loss of control Lt. J. P. Kelly ejected   McDonnell
21st July 1954
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Fire 2nd Lt. B. D. Comstock ejected   McDonnell
17th August 1954
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Fire Lt. R. C. Harris ejected   McDonnell
18th September 1954
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Explosion in engine Lt(jg) C. G. Jeffrey ejected   McDonnell
27th October 1954
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Flameout due to fuel exhaustion Cdr. R. P. Gift ejected   McDonnell
October 1954

NOT FOUND IN USN LISTING


USN
F2H Banshee     Aircraft caught fire at high altitude. Rescued on ground by CAP Joe Meder ejected at 40,000 feet falling almost 30,000 feet as he wrestled with his ejection seat, he was  able to separate from it and get his parachute open, only to have it rip  and begin to lose air. He landed heavily breaking both ankles  and numerous other bones, also puncturing a lung. He crawled 150 feet  before collapsing in a rain drenched bean field.   McDonnell
  In October 1954, Navy pilot Joe Meder became one of the many crash survivors who owe their lives to CAP. Flying at night at 40,00 feet in stormy skies, he was forced to ejected from his burning Banshee jet fighter. Falling almost 30,00 feet as he wrestled with his ejection seat, he was able to separate from it and get his parachute open, only to have it rip and begin to lose air. He slammed into the ground, breaking both ankles and numerous other bones, and puncturing a lung. He crawled 150 feet before collapsing in a rain drenched bean field. Nearing death, Meder was spotted at first light by CAP pilots Vince Causmaker and John Zonge who were part of a two-state air and ground search team. from

http://www.coloradowingcap.org/douglas/Home/Visitors/History.htm

 

26th November 1954
USN
F2H-2P Banshee     Mid-air collision 1st Lt. G. H. Mennig ejected   McDonnell
20th January 1955
USN
F2H-2P Banshee     Explosion and fire Ensign G. M. Dwyer ejected   McDonnell
27th January 1955
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Fire in cockpit Cdr. F. K. Bushner ejected   McDonnell
15th February 1955
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Fire in flight Lt(jg) D. L. Vanner ??? ejected   McDonnell
14th February 1955
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Vertigo, loss of control 2nd Lt. E. J. Murphy ejected   McDonnell
14th March 1955
USN
F2H-2P Banshee     Loss of Control 2nd Lt. C. S. Ritter ejected   McDonnell
11th July 1955
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Loss of Control Lt(jg) J. K. ??ctliff ejected   McDonnell
25th August 1955
USN
F2H-2 Banshee       Major J. H. Jack???? ejected   McDonnell
7th September 1955
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Collision with tow cable Lt(jg) Kiddle ejected   McDonnell
19th October 1955
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Fuel exhaustion Lt. D. R. Hillery ejected   McDonnell
19th October 1955
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Mid-air collision Lt(jg) R. J. Manning   McDonnell
19th October 1955
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Mid-air collision Lt(jg) W. N. Campbell ejected   McDonnell
29th October 1955
USN
F2H-2B Banshee     Fire in flight Lt. Cdr. J. W. Gilbert ejected   McDonnell
11th October 1955
USN
F2H-2 Banshee   VA-76   Lt(jg) John B. Kunz ejected   McDonnell
7th December 1955
USN
 McDonnell Douglas F2H2 Banshee     Collision, flown into while flying an instrument training flight in VFR conditions over Richmond, VA at
20,000 feet.
Ensign Robert Ammann ejected  200 knots

[personal testimony]

McDonnell
4th February 1956
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Explosion and fire Lt(jg) E. L. Jenkins ejected   McDonnell
28th June 1956
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Flameout - both engines Lt(jg) R. W. Utterback ejected   McDonnell
17th August 1956
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Unintentional M.Sgt. W. G. Knapp ejected   McDonnell
29th August 1956
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Electrical failure Lt. P. S. Polgar ejected   McDonnell
22nd November 1956
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Fire in cockpit Lt(jg) Gum???? ejected   McDonnell
6th December 1956
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Fuel exhaustion Lt(jg) D. J. Bohe (?)   McDonnell
8th April 1957
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Flat spin Ensign S. P. Walsyzak ??? ejected   McDonnell
31st May 1957
RCN
F2H-3 Banshee 126313
"104"
VF-870 During impromptu flypast CJATC Rivers Manitoba - lost starboard wing tip tank, then the wing near McNab Island Lt. Derk A. Prout killed
ejection sequence appears to have been started as canopy ejected just as aircraft hit the water.
  McDonnell
27th August 1957
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     aircraft disintegrated in flight 1st Lt. F. M. Parsons ejected   McDonnell
29th August 1957
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Stall 1st Lt. J. M. Martin ejected   McDonnell
7th December 1957
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Mid-air collision Lt. J. P. Zebrowski ejected   McDonnell
7th December 1957
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Mid-air collision Lt(jg) P. H. Lisman ejected   McDonnell
29th December 1957
USN
F2H-3 Banshee     Fuel exhaustion Lt(jg) Robert Colville ejected   McDonnell
4th March 1958
RCN
F2H-3 Banshee 126333
"142"
VF-871
HMCS Bonaventure
Port wheel skidded off deck. Fell from flight deck. Lt. Cdr. Brian Bell-Irving ejected. Seriously injured   McDonnell
27th March 1958
USN
F2H-4 Banshee     Flameout Lt. M. A. Zibilick ejected   McDonnell
4th August 1958
USN
F2H-2 Banshee     Crashed on take off Lt. Cdr. J. R. Ske??? ejected   McDonnell
                 
More Banshee losses to add to this list. I'd be grateful if anyone has any photos of the pilots who ejected or were lost. I believe early Naval Aviation News magazines or US Navy Times may have carried photos of some of these pilots
 

FEEDBACK

 

I read your ad in the July 2006 MOAA magazine and thought I would send you
the following:

I was a newly designated U.S. Naval Aviator and green Ensign assigned to
Attack Squadron 76 stationed at Oceana, VA in May of 1955. We had been
assigned Reserve Force McDonnel Douglas F2H2 Banshee aircraft while waiting
for our Grumman F9F8 Cougars. On Dec 7, 1955 (as auspicious date) I was
flying an instrument training flight in VFR conditions over Richmond, VA at
20,000 feet. My leader was in the chase position acting as FAA control
providing me with flight clearance instructions. I had just entered a
holding pattern at about 200 knots awaiting further clearance from my flight
leader. As I rolled out of a turn I felt a significant "bump" and the
aircraft started a right climbing turn I had not commanded. I attempted to
lower the nose and level the wings but the aircraft did not respond and kept
climbing to the right. I realized I did not have control and elected to
eject. When I released my grip on the control stick the control stick
smashed into the instrument panel breaking the glass on the directional gyro
instrument. Convinced that I was no longer in control I raised the leg
restraints and reached for the face curtain. I pulled the face curtain and
was ejected successfully from the aircraft. )It wasn't until I was on the
ground and had called back to the squadron that I learned that my flight
leader had run into my vertical stabilizer with his starboard wing tank,
ripping the fuselage just forward of the empennage. The wind stream then
tore the entire empennage, which was intact except for a bent vertical
stabilizer, from the aircraft. It was the departure of the empennage that
pulled the control cables causing the right climbing turn).

I succesfully separated myself manually from the ejection seat, located the
parachute D ring and popped the chute. I was still about 20000 feet so it
took almost 20 minutes to reach the ground. I was uninjured and I only lost
the kneepad cards from my kneeboard which stayed on my thigh. The aircraft
and associated parts (empennage, seat, canopy, and tailless aircraft) hit
the ground in a high class residential area causing a house fire. By the
time I reached the ground news of the aircraft impact was already on the TV.

There is more to this sea story but I figure this is enough for now. Let me
know what else you would like and I will see what I can retrieve.

Regards,

Robert Ammann
CAPT, USN, Retired